New Snoring Mouthpieces Review Blog Post Offers Advice To People Suffering From Exhaustion

Originally at: https://snoringmouthpiecereview.org/press/new-snoring-mouthpieces-review-blog-post-offers-advice-to-people-suffering-from-exhaustion

The Snoring Mouthpiece Review, which is based in Long Beach, California, has published a new blog post that offers advice to people suffering from exhaustion when they wake up in the morning. The article is titled, “Are You Exhausted When You Wake Up In The Morning?” It presents some remedies for people who feel exhausted even after waking up in the morning. It is pointed out that the primary reason is that the person is not getting enough sleep and that it could be even be related to a more serious condition, which is sleep apnea.

Steve Walker, a spokesperson for The Snoring Mouthpiece Review, says, “Sleep apnea actually causes you to stop breathing while sleeping. Your airway gets blocked as your muscles relax during sleep with the result that little to no air gets to your lungs. So, even if you think you’ve slept long enough, you still feel exhausted when you wake up in the morning. This sleep disorder is also the reason why you snore so loud.”

Steve continues, “The condition is indicated by loud snoring that is usually followed by choking noises. And if the brain detects that insufficient oxygen is getting into the body, the person instinctively wakes up to be able to breathe again and this may happen several times during the night. No wonder, you feel exhausted when you wake up in the morning.”

It should be noted that loud snoring does not necessarily mean that a person suffers from sleep apnea. It is loud snoring that is followed by choking or gasping sounds, or silent pauses may likely indicate sleep apnea. It often results into sleep deprivation, which is indicated in the morning as fatigue, unintentional napping, difficulty concentrating, mood swings, and irritability. Other common symptoms include insomnia, feeling tired even after having a full night’s sleep, headaches and migraines, reduced sex drive, nocturia, and loss of memory.

Meanwhile, a solution for snoring is the Good Morning Snore Solution (GMSS). This is a snoring mouthpiece that helps people manage their snoring. It is a Tongue Stabilizing Device (TSD) mouthpiece that is unique when compared to other mouthpieces, which are usually Mandibular Advancement Devices (MADs). The GMSS will work even for people with temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorder or those have any type of specialized dental work, such as bridges, dentures, and others.

The GMSS is FDA-cleared and the company that produces it is accredited by the Better Business Bureau. It is comfortable to wear because it is flexible and made of soft material. It is also safe because it is free from BPA. Also, there is no problem about getting …

It’s Almost World Narcolepsy Day, Are You Ready?

Originally at: http://julieflygare.com/its-almost-world-narcolepsy-day-are-you-ready/

The week leading up to World Narcolepsy Day has quickly become one of the most surreal weeks of my life! Seeing posts, articles, videos and radio segments from around the globe honoring World Narcolepsy Day, wow!

World Narcolepsy Day Activities:

I will travel to Vancouver, Canada tomorrow to celebrate World Narcolepsy Day at World Sleep 2019, an international congress on sleep medicine. Join myself and Project Sleep virtually or in-person, here are some opportunities:

World Narcolepsy Day Pronouncement:

Tune in on Sunday, Sept. 22, 2019 at 12:00 noon ET for the World Narcolepsy Day Pronouncement – broadcasting via Facebook Live. Narcolepsy and idiopathic hypersomnia experts and community leaders gathered at World Sleep 2019 will discuss the importance of World Narcolepsy Day, raising awareness and advancing research to improve outcomes for people with narcolepsy and IH around the world.

To watch the live broadcast, simply go to Project Sleep’s Facebook page on Sunday 9/22 at 12noon ET and as soon as we “go live,” the video should show up in our newsfeed!

World Narcolepsy Day #NChat on Twitter

#Nchat is a monthly Twitter conversation that connects people with narcolepsy worldwide. Join in this special #WorldNarcolepsyDay #Nchat on Sunday, Sept. 22nd at 5:00 p.m. ET!

If you’re in the Vancouver area or attending World Sleep 2019, join us in-person for these opportunities:

  • World Narcolepsy Day “Selfie-Station” on Sunday, Sept. 22, 2019 from 10:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m. PT in the Public Foyer, Vancouver Convention Center
  • Julie Flygare’s Author Table on Sunday, Sept. 22, 2019 from 12:15 – 12:45 p.m. PT in the Public Foyer, Vancouver Convention Center
  • Inaugural World Narcolepsy Day Forum on Sunday, Sept. 22, 2019 from 5:30 – 6:30 p.m. PT in Room 109, Vancouver Convention Center
    • Speakers: Matt O’Neill, Narcolepsy UK, Julie Flygare, JD, Project Sleep, Claire Crisp, Wake Up Narcolepsy, Eveline Honig, MD, Narcolepsy Network, Rebecca King, Hypersomnia Foundation, Mark Patterson, MD, Day4Naps
    • Session description: To mark the inaugural World Narcolepsy Day, Sept 22, 2019, leaders of narcolepsy non-profit patient organizations will share programmatic highlights, best practices and key insights from the front lines. Clinicians, researchers and patient community members will learn about the latest resources from non-profit sector while also fostering new ideas for working together across disciplines to improve outcomes for people with narcolepsy across the world.

GLOBAL begins with LOCAL: 

Awareness begins with one person reaching out to another person in their community. This is why Project Sleep has designed a beautiful World Narcolepsy Day webpage with resources and graphics to help you raise your voice in your community. 

Quick Ways to Support:

  • Add the Facebook Frame: Show support on Facebook by adding the World Narcolepsy Day frame

Living One-Third of My Life with Narcolepsy

Originally at: http://julieflygare.com/living-one-third-of-my-life-with-narcolepsy/

Twelve years ago today, I was diagnosed with a classic case of type 1 narcolepsy with cataplexy, just four days after my 24th birthday. So as of today, four days after my 36th birthday, I’ve now spent one-third of my life officially as a “person with narcolepsy” (not counting the years of symptoms before diagnosis).

For fun today, I searched my emails from that fateful day, Sept 18, 2007, and interestingly, I didn’t mention “narcolepsy” once via email that day, but I did send a lot of writing samples and cover letters for law firm job interviews… Interviews for fancy jobs I would never secure, and visions of “success” I would never realize.

“Futures have a way of falling down in mid-flight.” ~Veronica Shoffstall, After A While

It took a while for me to realize I wasn’t going to “get better and go back to my life as planned” after starting treatment. The emails to my dad proclaiming: “I HATE narcolepsy” started a few months later. For me, the hell of the next several years was a lifetime low.

“Innovation doesn’t happen because there’s some person who’s in some great circumstance and everything is going well and they get on a roll and they make something for the world. Innovation happens—art happens—because of suffering.” ~Claire Wineland, Klick MUSE New York

So here I stand, just four days away from the inaugural World Narcolepsy Day on Sept. 22, 2019. This week, I’m seeing posts from Japan, Australia, Brazil, Myanmar, Argentina, Spain, Finland, the UK, Ireland, and Israel. It’s totally surreal.

This is one of those moments that have made the past one-third of my life the richest years, with lessons learned about pushing beyond my comfort zone, letting go of other people’s expectations, standing up for what i believe in even when its not popular, and finding the courage to build my dream organization Project Sleep to align with like-minded people who want to disrupt the status quo and innovate for a brighter future.

No matter where you are, I want you to know that it is temporary and will not last forever. It’s a bubble. Things will shift or eventually, you can change bubbles. I never could’ve imagined where i would turn up 12 years after my narcolepsy diagnosis, it’s much bigger and more meaningful than anything i ever dreamed for myself.

I never could’ve reached this reality without your support. Thank you to YOUR kindness, trust and love over so many years.❣

from Blog – Julie Flygare http://julieflygare.com/living-one-third-of-my-life-with-narcolepsy/…

Listen: Julie Flygare on Present Not Perfect Podcast in honor of World Narcolepsy Day

Originally at: http://julieflygare.com/listen-julie-flygare-on-present-not-perfect-podcast-in-honor-of-world-narcolepsy-day/

Two people with narcolepsy. Double the insight!

A few minutes into recording, I realized I’d never recorded a podcast with a fellow person with narcolepsy before. This interview with Leyla Sarper for the “Present Not Perfect” podcast was such a neat experience. I’m super excited to share this with you today!

Listen now on Spotify here. Also available on Apple Podcasts, Stitcher, Google Podcasts and more! Just search “Present Not Perfect.”

What did we discuss?

  • being present,
  • letting go of self-guilt,
  • what is sleepiness?
  • coping with invisible illness,
  • Wide Awake and Dreaming: A Memoir of Narcolepsy,
  • cataplexy from Celine Dion,
  • nap rooms at work,
  • awesome dads,
  • building my “no” muscle,
  • learning the world doesn’t revolve around me,
  • re-arranging my life around my passions,
  • finding the courage to START, and
  • and of course, World Narcolepsy Day!!

To listen: Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, Google Podcasts and more! Just search “Present Not Perfect.”

I hope you will enjoy and share. Thank you for your support!

from Blog – Julie Flygare http://julieflygare.com/listen-julie-flygare-on-present-not-perfect-podcast-in-honor-of-world-narcolepsy-day/…

Snoring: From An Engineer’s Point Of View

Originally at: https://snoringmouthpiecereview.org/good-morning-snore-solution/snoring-from-an-engineers-point-of-view

Snoring is often talked about by doctors. Well, that makes sense. After all, snoring is a health issue that deserves medical attention. That puts doctors in a very good position to impart critical information about snoring. Needless to say, they’re the best people who can help cure it as well.

It’s seldom that we hear engineers talk about snoring. So, when they do, our ears are open.

Haibo Dong is an associate professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering.

Dong and Ph.D. students Junshi Wang and Pan Han are gaining new understanding of the fundamental science behind sleep apnea by using CT scans and MRIs to image the mouth and nose and the full airway – the “windpipe” – during snoring and apnea, and then computer-modeling the actions that cause vibrations of the uvula and obstructions. They are looking for the changes in the shape of the airway during sleep that cause perturbations in airflow. Those perturbations are the vibrations of snoring and the often-resulting breathing difficulties.

(Via: https://news.virginia.edu/content/when-snoring-goes-annoying-dangerous-engineer-studies-sleep-apnea)

Snoring can be treated. Unfortunately, some treatments fail.

“Treatments often fail because there is a knowledge gap of the fundamental science behind the reasons for this health issue,” said Haibo Dong, a University of Virginia associate professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering who specializes in fluid dynamics research.

(Via: https://news.virginia.edu/content/when-snoring-goes-annoying-dangerous-engineer-studies-sleep-apnea)

Understanding how snoring is produced can help bridge the gap. Research that puts together engineers and doctors can hopefully solve that.

If Dong’s team and his research colleagues, including Dr. James Daniero, a head and neck surgeon in UVA’s Department of Otolaryngology, can understand the basic mechanics of sound produced during normal breathing, then perhaps better treatments and longer-term solutions for abnormalities may be possible.

“This work is highly interdisciplinary and involves scientific problems in the fields of biology, physics, physiology and engineering,” Dong said. “By studying biological fluid dynamics, we are trying to predict and eventually control sleep apnea and snoring.”

(Via: https://news.virginia.edu/content/when-snoring-goes-annoying-dangerous-engineer-studies-sleep-apnea)

Read on to see how they’re trying to do it.

Dong has now modeled both normal breathing and the breathing conditions of sleep apnea for people from 8 months to 80 years old. He is identifying the “force reduction,” the point when normal breathing does not provide enough air volume to keep the front and back of the airway open, resulting in collapse.

“With a normal airway, we see a very smooth channel that doesn’t vibrate much, and where there is not much force difference on the airway walls during breathing,” Dong said. “But with sleep apnea, we see fluctuations in force that become bigger and bigger, causing more and more vibration.

The Truth About Prescription and OTC Sleep Aids [Podcast 71]

Originally at: https://doctorstevenpark.com/sleepaids?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=sleepaids sleeping pill

In this episode, Kathy and I are going to be talking about another controversial topic that many of you have probably had some experience with at one time or another…and that’s the issue of sleeping pills and OTC sleep aids. In particular, we will be discussing:

  • Why sleeping pills are usually the wrong way of treating insomnia
  • Why insomnia may not really be insomnia
  • How to wean yourself off sleeping pills
  • A non-prescription therapy that’s better than sleeping pills in the long run.

Download mp3  |  Subscribe  |  Transcript

Show Notes:

Medicalization of sleepiness

Americans getting worse at taking sleeping pills

Increase in visits to the ER due to Ambien

Podcast: How to sleep better without medications

Podcast: How medications are harming you 

Risk of complications for sleeping pills

Sleeping pills and risk of dying and cancer

Sleeping pills and risk of bony fractures

Sleep-eating

Zolpidem and risk of Parkinson’s

Insomnia increases risk of dying

Insomnia as a harbinger of mental illness

Insomnia and future risk of heart disease

Insomnia and increased risk of dementia

Hip fractures with Ambien

Sleeping pill vs. CBT-i study

3 Ps of insomnia 

Krakow’s OSA in treatment resistant insomnia study

Dr. Krakow’s podcast on OSA and Insomnia

Dreams about choking while sleeping

Sleep endoscopy in AHI < 5 study

UARS paper – Guilleminault

SLEEPINESS 10 steps: checklist of good sleep habits

Podcast 65: How to sleep better without medications

3 Rs: Sleep restriction, reconditioning and relaxation

Neck stretching exercises

Two floppy valves videos

Online CBT-i programs

 

The post The Truth About Prescription and OTC Sleep Aids [Podcast 71] appeared first on Doctor Steven Y. Park, MD | New York, NY | Integrative Solutions for Obstructive Sleep Apnea, Upper Airway Resistance Syndrome, and Snoring.

from Doctor Steven Y. Park, MD | New York, NY | Integrative Solutions for Obstructive Sleep Apnea, Upper Airway Resistance Syndrome, and SnoringBlog – Doctor Steven Y. Park, MD | New York, NY | Integrative Solutions for Obstructive Sleep Apnea, Upper Airway Resistance Syndrome, and Snoring https://doctorstevenpark.com/sleepaids?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=sleepaids…

New Snoring Mouthpieces Review Post On Getting A Good Night’s Sleep Released

Originally at: https://snoringmouthpiecereview.org/press/new-snoring-mouthpieces-review-post-on-getting-a-good-nights-sleep-released

The Snoring Mouthpiece Review, which is based in Long Beach, California, has recently published a blog post that offers a simple way to get a good night’s sleep. The article is titled, “A Simple Way To A Good Night’s Sleep.” It explores the various ways of preventing snoring in order to allow a person to sleep tight at night.

“While getting a good night’s sleep is important for good health, unfortunately, it’s not easy to get a good night’s sleep,” says Steve Walker, a spokesperson for The Snoring Mouthpiece Review.

He adds, “There will be some nights when your sleep is good and there will be some nights when your sleep is bad. If you’re a snorer, you probably have more nights of bad sleep. If you’re hardly getting any good night’s sleep, you’re going to get sick. And, if your partner says you snore, accept it and decide to do something about it. Don’t even attempt to deny it because the sooner you deal with your snoring, the better it is for your health and your relationship. Keep in mind that sleep apnea is a serious health problem.”

Sleep apnea is a disorder where the breathing of the affected person stops and starts several times during sleep. It causes momentary oxygen deprivation during those times when the person stops breathing and this particular disorder has been linked to stroke, heart disease, diabetes, high blood pressure, and even depression. It has even been found to be the cause of 38,000 deaths every year.

There are many ways to prevent sleep apnea. One possible solution is the Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP) machine. However, the CPAP machine may not be a convenient solution because the person has to wear a mask that will cover the whole face. It is not exactly a comfortable thing to wear while sleeping. That is why people are looking for some other alternative, such as an oral appliance or mouthpiece that fits the mouth comfortably while being effective in preventing snoring and sleep apnea.

One example of a good mouthpiece is the SleepTight. This is a wire-free mouthpiece that was developed by a dentist. Its advantage over the CPAP machine is that it is comfortable to wear and it is less expensive. It is made of thermoplastic and the person who will wear it will just need to put it in boiling water for three minutes. Doing that will soften up the mouthpiece and the wearer can then bite on it to provide a custom impression of the person’s teeth. This custom fit can be retained by simply submerging the mouthpiece in cold …

Zany Ways To Stop Snoring

Originally at: https://snoringmouthpiecereview.org/zquiet/zany-ways-to-stop-snoring

You’ll do anything to stop snoring. Who wouldn’t? If you’re losing sleep with your partner’s snoring or vice versa, the two of you would really have to do something about it. If not, both of you are going to go nuts. Unless you’re Iron Man who can function pretty well without sleep, then you’re okay. But then, Iron Man is dead. In retrospect, he probably needed his sleep as well.

Snoring is one of the common reasons why people can’t sleep. It gets in the way for both the snorer and the non snorer.

Snoring is a buzz kill, a sleep robber and maybe an indicator of serious health issues, including the obstructive sleep apnea that can lead to heart disease.

(Via: https://www.ajc.com/lifestyles/health-med-fit/odd-but-effective-ways-stop-snoring/UilcBeHzvPGy7dY1X3fJeN/)

There are a lot of Americans who snore. As a matter of fact, millions of Americans snore.

Some 90 million American adults snore, according to sleepfoundation.org, and many could find relief with general health solutions.

The Mayo Clinic recommends getting 7-8 hours of sleep a night if you snore, for example, or losing weight since overweight people can have extra throat tissues that contribute to snoring.

(Via: https://www.ajc.com/lifestyles/health-med-fit/odd-but-effective-ways-stop-snoring/UilcBeHzvPGy7dY1X3fJeN/)

It is definitely a good idea to get 7-8 hours of sleep every single day. What if the person beside you is the snorer and you can’t even get an hour of sleep?

It wouldn’t hurt to lose some weight to see if it can help stop the snoring but what if it can’t? Well, you can always try these zany ways to stop snoring.

One zany way to stop snoring is to use a tennis ball.

Lying on your back when you sleep puts greater pressure on your throat, so shifting to your side may work to quiet loud snoring, Dr. M. Safwan Badr, president of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine, told Huffington Post. To improve your odds of actually staying asleep on your side, sew a tennis ball into the front pocket of an old t-shirt, then wear the shirt backwards to bed. This should make it super uncomfortable to lie on your back once you drift off. Once you’ve adjusted to the new sleep position (and stopped snoring), you can ditch the uncomfy shirt.

(Via: https://www.ajc.com/lifestyles/health-med-fit/odd-but-effective-ways-stop-snoring/UilcBeHzvPGy7dY1X3fJeN/)

That’s just one zany way to stop snoring.  You can also try sleeping with a longer pillow.

According to Reader’s Digest, a full-length body pillow can help you adjust to sleeping on your side.

(Via: https://www.ajc.com/lifestyles/health-med-fit/odd-but-effective-ways-stop-snoring/UilcBeHzvPGy7dY1X3fJeN/)

Dr. Gene Sambataro, who is a dentist, also recommends tongue aerobics.

Sounds a little odd, and you may not want an audience, but strengthening your tongue

Fluoride: Friend or Foe?

Originally at: https://doctorstevenpark.com/fluoride-friend-or-foe?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=fluoride-friend-or-foe brushing teeth with fluoride toothpaste

In the 2006 cult classic movie Idiocracy, the main character Joe Bauers takes part in a secret military hibernation experiment, but wakes up 500 years later into a dystopian world where commercialism and anti-intellectualism have run rampant, with IQ rates that have plummeted. He is found to be the smartest person in the world and is appointed to become the President. 

Whenever I see studies linking fluoride ingestion with lowered IQ rates, this movie comes to mind. Why an I concerned?

Adding fluoride to our nation’s water supply has been touted as a major public health success story, resulting in significantly lowered rates of cavities (~25%). However, ever since the inception of the program in 1945, there have been strong opinions for and against it. I’ve always had mixed feelings about fluoride, but over the years, a handful of studies linking fluoride levels to lowered IQ levels led me into a rabbit hole of confusing, often conflicting studies. What I explain in this article is my reason for coming to the conclusion that ultimately, we’re better off without fluoride in our water supply. 

Fluoride’s Link to Lower IQ

There have been a myriad of studies over many decades associating fluoride with various health conditions, including flourosis,  cancer, bone fractures, hypothyroidism, acne, earlier puberty in girls, pineal gland calcification, and lowered intelligence. Numerous arguments are made countering the above associations as well.  

A 2012 systematic review and meta-analysis of 27 studies over 22 years from Harvard combined all the highest quality studies on fluoride exposure and IQ, showing that children living in areas with higher fluoride exposure had significantly lower IQ scores (about 7 points). Needless to say, this study attracted a lot of headlines and media coverage.

In 2017, researchers from the the United States, Canada and Mexico found that children had a 6 point drop in IQ score with each 1 mg/L increase in maternal urine fluoride levels.  

Just last month in JAMA Pediatrics, researchers from York University in Toronto published results showing that in mothers living in areas of fluoride water during pregnancy (compared to non-fluoridated water) had children with lower IQ rates. They measured the mother’s urine fluoride levels as well as estimated fluoride intake levels based on dietary factors and local water supply fluoride concentrations. They found that for every 1 ml/L increase in maternal urine fluoride levels, IQ levels dropped by 4.5 points, but in boys only. When maternal fluoride intake was measured, IQ diminished by 3.7 points in both boys and girls.

This study went against the grain amongst the medical …

Sleep Talk: Episode 45 – Sharing a Bed

Originally at: https://sleephub.com.au/podcast-45/

Episode 45: Sharing a Bed

Is sharing a bed with a partner good for sleep? On one level partners can be noisy, move around and be the cause of sleep disruption. But on the other hand, they can provide a sense of security and closeness. This month we discuss the pros and cons of sharing a bed.

Dr Moira Junge (Health Psychologist) and Dr David Cunnington (Sleep Physician) host the monthly podcast, Sleep Talk – Talking all things sleep.

Leave a review and subscribe via Apple Podcasts

Audio Timeline / Chapters:

  • 00:00 – 01:42 Introduction
  • 01:42 – 23:54 Theme – Alcohol and Sleep
  • 23:54 – 25:06 Clinical Tip
  • 25:06 – 27:32 Pick of the Month
  • 27:32 – 29:05 What’s Coming Up?

Next episode: Sleep and Cannabinoids

Links mentioned in the podcast: 

Presenters:

Dr Moira JungeDr Moira Junge is a health psychologist working in the sleep field, who has considerable experience working with people with sleeping difficulties in a multidisciplinary practice using a team-based approach. Moira is actively involved with the Australasian Sleep Association (ASA) and a board member of the Sleep Health Foundation. She has presented numerous workshops for psychologists and is involved with Monash University with teaching and supervision commitments. She is one of the founders and clinic directors at Yarraville Health Group which was established in 1998. In addition to her expertise in sleep disorders, her other areas of interest and expertise include smoking cessation, psychological adjustment to chronic illness, and grief and loss issues.

 

Dr David CunningtonDr David Cunnington is a sleep physician and director of Melbourne Sleep Disorders Centre, and co-founder and contributor to SleepHub. David trained in sleep medicine both in Australia and in the United States, at Harvard Medical School, and is certified as both an International Sleep Medicine Specialist and International Behavioural Sleep Medicine Specialist. David’s clinical practice covers all areas of sleep medicine and he is actively involved in training health professionals in sleep. David is a regular media commentator on sleep, both in traditional media …