How Does Sleep Deprivation Affect The Body?

Originally at: https://snoringmouthpiecereview.org/good-morning-snore-solution/how-does-sleep-deprivation-affect-the-body

Is something, or are some things keeping you up? Maybe you’ve had a lot of coffee than you normally do, or maybe you are having insomnia for some reason. If you are not getting the recommended hours of sleep a day, you won’t just feel tired, cranky, and moody the next day. Sleep deprivation has other effects too.

 

Sleep is an important part of everyday life. It is just as important as eating. The body won’t last for too long if left without sleep. In other words, it is crucial. But it isn’t just the hours of sleep that you get that should be paid attention to. It’s also the quality of it. Other than making the brain hazy, sleep deprivation can adversely affect other parts of the body as well.

 

The brain is a part of a bigger system called the Central Nervous System. Brain cells travel and function within it. A deprivation in sleep can cause fatigue in the brain.

During sleep, pathways form between nerve cells (neurons) in your brain that help you remember new information you’ve learned. Sleep deprivation leaves your brain exhausted, so it can’t perform its duties as well.

You may also find it more difficult to concentrate or learn new things. The signals your body send may also be delayed, decreasing your coordination and increasing your risk for accidents.

Sleep deprivation also negatively affects your mental abilities and emotional state. You may feel more impatient or prone to mood swings. It can also compromise decision-making processes and creativity.

(Via:https://www.healthline.com/health/sleep-deprivation/effects-on-body#4)

 

Your immune system functions to protect the body from foreign invaders, especially pathogenic ones. It also works to fight such intruders.

While you sleep, your immune system produces protective, infection-fighting substances like cytokines. It uses these substances to combat foreign invaders such as bacteria and viruses.

Cytokines also help you sleep, giving your immune system more energy to defend your body against illness.

Sleep deprivation prevents your immune system from building up its forces. If you don’t get enough sleep, your body may not be able to fend off invaders, and it may also take you longer to recover from illness.

(Via:https://www.healthline.com/health/sleep-deprivation/effects-on-body#4)

 

Sleep deprivation also negatively affects the respiratory system.

The relationship between sleep and the respiratory system goes both ways. A nighttime breathing disorder called obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) can interrupt your sleep and lower the quality.

As you wake up throughout the night, this can cause sleep deprivation, which leaves you more vulnerable to respiratory infections like the common cold and flu. Sleep deprivation can also make existing respiratory diseases worse,

How Important Is Sleep To Children?

Originally at: https://snoringmouthpiecereview.org/snorerx/how-important-is-sleep-to-children

Kids do get sleep. In fact, babies sleep almost all the time. While adults need the recommended 7-9 hours of sleep a day, babies need 2/3 of the day sleeping.

As children grow older, the amount of sleep they need varies:

  • toddlers: 11 to 14 hours
  • preschoolers: 10 to 13 hours
  • school-aged children: 9 to 12 hours
  • teens: 8 to 10 hours

(Via:https://www.healthline.com/health/how-much-deep-sleep-do-you-need#deep-sleep)

Children need to have good quality and quantity of sleep simply because they are growing. And sleep helps support their growth stage. A lot of things can happen during the growth stage. They will need all the help they can get for optimum growth. And sleep is one of them.

 

Deep sleep stimulates growth, especially in babies.

“Growth hormone is primarily secreted during deep sleep,” says Judith Owens, M.D., director of sleep medicine at Children’s National Medical Center, in Washington, D.C., and a Parents advisor. Mother Nature seems to have protected babies by making sure they spend about 50 percent of their time in this deep sleep, considered to be essential for adequate growth. Italian researchers, studying children with deficient levels of growth hormone, have found that they sleep less deeply than average children do.

(Via:https://www.parents.com/health/healthy-happy-kids/the-7-reasons-your-kid-needs-sleep/)

 

Even at a young stage, sleep protects children from cardiovascular harm due to cholesterol and stress hormones.

“Children with sleep disorders have excessive brain arousal during sleep, which can trigger the fight-or-flight response hundreds of times each night,” says Jeffrey Durmer, M.D., Ph.D., a sleep specialist and researcher in Atlanta. “Their blood glucose and cortisol remain elevated at night. Both are linked to higher levels of diabetes, obesity, and even heart disease.”

(Via:https://www.parents.com/health/healthy-happy-kids/the-7-reasons-your-kid-needs-sleep/)

 

Children, including babies, can actually go overboard with food as well, especially if parents mistook their babies’ cry as hunger. But getting enough sleep can counter this.

That’s key, because the sleep-weight connection seems to snowball. When we’ve eaten enough to be satisfied, our fat cells create the hormone leptin, which signals us to stop eating. Sleep deprivation may impact this hormone, so kids keep right on eating. “Over time, kids who don’t get enough sleep are more likely to be obese,” says Dorit Koren, M.D., a pediatric endocrinologist and sleep researcher at the University of Chicago.

Worn-out kids also eat differently than those who are well rested. “Research has shown that children, like adults, crave higher-fat or higher-carb foods when they’re tired,” Dr. Koren says. “Tired children also tend to be more sedentary, so they burn fewer calories.”

(Via:https://www.parents.com/health/healthy-happy-kids/the-7-reasons-your-kid-needs-sleep/)

 

Another great thing about sleep is that it can combat pathogenic microorganisms. The …

Sleep: What You Need To Know

Originally at: https://snoringmouthpiecereview.org/blog/sleep-what-you-need-to-know

Mankind has never been busier before than they are now. Today is all about hustling. And it is becoming a norm. At work, there are a lot of things that need to be done in a short period of time. The same goes at home. Getting sleep is almost a luxury. Time ticks so fast that often times we have a hard time getting a hold of it. But if you don’t know it yet, sleep is a vital part of life.

 

Sleep, more specifically enough sleep and good quality sleep, is crucial so you could work efficiently and safely. Not getting enough of it can lead to many problems.

According to the NSF, these are some of the ramifications of sleep problems:

  • Decreased alertness and attentiveness
  • Increased irritability and relationship difficulties
  • Decreased concentration and judgment
  • Decreased performance and productivity
  • Increased risk of accidents

(Via:https://www.parents.com/parenting/moms/healthy-mom/adult-sleep/)

 

Sleep deprivation can cause lessen work efficiency and competence. It can also affect relationships. And most of all, it can get you in an unwanted accident. So if you want to be at the top of your game, all you might be missing is a good night’s sleep. Safety is crucial as well. Getting enough sleep will prevent road accidents from taking place.

 

The recommended hours of sleep is at 7-9 hours a day. But for some people who aren’t getting enough sleep lately, the numbers may change. To determine it yourself, you can do a simple test.

The amount of sleep needed varies with each individual. The NSF suggests a simple experiment to determine your optimum amount of sleep. You need a week or so to determine it, so you should be able to go to sleep when you’re tired and wake up naturally with no alarm clock. Taking a vacation or planning to have someone to help with your children is necessary to do this test.

Simply go to bed when you feel tired, and get up when you feel ready — don’t set an alarm clock. For a few days, you might be sleeping more if you’ve been deprived of sleep. But once you catch up, your body will tell you just how many hours you need to restore yourself each night. Once you’ve learned this important fact about yourself, you can adjust your schedule accordingly.

(Via:https://www.parents.com/parenting/moms/healthy-mom/adult-sleep/)

 

Napping is also a good way of resting. In fact, it can be great.

According to the NSF, a 15- to 20-minute nap can be very beneficial. It can help your alertness and memory, and reduce feelings of fatigue. Napping is a good way

Light and Deep Sleep: How Much Do You Need For Each Of Them?

Originally at: https://snoringmouthpiecereview.org/good-morning-snore-solution/light-and-deep-sleep-how-much-do-you-need-for-each-of-them

It is recommended for adults to have 7-9 hours of sleep every day. If you think that’s a lot of time and that you could have done something productive at that time, then it depends on what you mean by productive because resting the body for 7-9 hours is fruitful itself.

 

The body goes through a lot while you sleep so you can be more productive when you wake up. It goes through stages of sleep. Along with knowing that you need 7-9 hours of sleep a day, it is also important to know how much you need per stage of it.

There are five stages of sleep that rotate between non-rapid eye movement (NREM) and rapid eye movement (REM) and include drowsiness, light sleep, moderate to deep sleep, deepest sleep, and dreaming.

Experts have recommended that adults gets about 7 to 9 hours of sleep per night. New research aims to identify not just how much total sleep you need — but also how much of each stage of sleep you need.

Sleep stages 1, 2, and REM consist of light sleep, while 3 and 4 comprise deep sleep.

(Via:https://www.healthline.com/health/how-much-deep-sleep-do-you-need)

 

Healthy individuals need about a quarter of the total number of sleeping hours to be in deep sleep.

In healthy adults, about 13 to 23 percent of your sleep is deep sleep. So if you sleep for 8 hours a night, that’s roughly 62 to 110 minutes.

However, as you get older you require less deep sleep.

During deep sleep, a variety of functions take place in the mind and body:

  • memories are consolidated
  • learning and emotions process
  • physical recovery occurs
  • blood sugar levels and metabolism balance out
  • the immune system is energized
  • the brain detoxifies

(Via:https://www.healthline.com/health/how-much-deep-sleep-do-you-need)

 

The same goes for REM sleep. The REM cycle starts at 1 ½ hours after you’ve fallen asleep and repeats at the same time interval.

For most adults, REM takes up about 20 to 25 percent of sleep, and this seems to be healthy during average sleep cycles. However, sleep research is raising some interesting questions. One recent study suggested that higher amounts of REM sleep may be associated with depression. But don’t go making sudden changes in your sleep habits — it is not clear which is the cause and which is the effect.

(Via:https://www.healthline.com/health/how-much-deep-sleep-do-you-need)

 

For light sleep, the stage when you are in transition to a more stable sleep, there is no minimum. But you have to remember that too much of it has consequences.

Although sleep scientists believe that light sleep is good for you, there

What’s Causing You To Snore?

Originally at: https://snoringmouthpiecereview.org/sleeptight/whats-causing-you-to-snore

You won’t always know that you snore. In fact, you don’t actually realize that you are snoring. It’s your partner that knows and complains especially if it gets loud. It can be really loud.

 

Snoring affects millions of people. But why do people snore? What is it really? Well, have you noticed an animation about someone singing loudly that their tiny tissue hanging on their throat is showing? Yes, that one. Sound is produced when air vibrates within the soft palates and that tissue. This happens when your airways get narrow.

When you hear someone snoring, it means air is not flowing freely through the back of the throat. The sound occurs when air causes vibration of the soft palate and the uvula, the tiny pink flap of tissue that hangs down at the rear of your throat.

(Via:http://www.columbianeurology.org/neurology/staywell/document.php?id=136)

 

Besides being an inconvenience to other people, snoring can mean something else to you. Snoring is not a disease or an illness. But it can be a symptom or a cause of a medical condition.

Asides from being a nuisance to your friends or your partner, snoring also affects how you sleep. It reduces the quality of your sleep, could result in sleep apnea or lead to chronic sleep deprivation. Ever woken up in the morning tired, cranky and not quite feeling like you got a good night time’s rest? Snoring might be the cause.

(Via:https://www.sleepcycle.com/snoring/10-natural-snoring-remedies/)

 

We need to know the factors other than medical ones that could affect snoring so we can properly address it on our own. The first and common one is weight. If you weigh more than you should at your age, height, or physical activities, then chances are that you’ll snore. If biology were to be a basis, then men are less fortunate than women.

A couple of factors come into play here. One popular one is weight. Carrying excess weight around your neck and throat can cause snoring. Then there is good old biology. In general, men have narrower air passages than women and are most likely to snore.

(Via:https://www.sleepcycle.com/snoring/10-natural-snoring-remedies/)

 

Not having head elevation while sleeping is also a factor.

Sleeping flat on your back could also make you more susceptible to snoring. Even the shape of your mouth or a stuffy nose from a cold could make you sound like an old engine revving up.

(Via:https://www.sleepcycle.com/snoring/10-natural-snoring-remedies/)

 

The current condition of your nasal passages is another one.

Another very popular one is the structure of your entire nasal cavity. Deviated septums, nasal polyps and enlarged tonsils could be the

How To Address Snoring Naturally

Originally at: https://snoringmouthpiecereview.org/snorerx/how-to-address-snoring-naturally

You will snore at some point in your life. That is a fact. Will it imply that something is wrong? Yes, it can. Can something be done to address it? Yes to that as well.

 

Snoring happens when your air has a hard time getting through your air passages. The air vibrates within the walls of the throat and produces a sound that we know as a snore. Snoring is more common in middle to older aged people. The loud kind of snore, that is. Snoring can be both a symptom of a condition or a cause to it. This is why knowing your health condition, medical condition, sleeping practices, and the way you snore can help determine how to address your snoring problems.

 

If your snoring isn’t caused by a medical condition, then you can opt for a treatment that won’t necessarily require medical attention. But if you are in doubt, it’s best to consult your physician. Here are some natural measures you can do about your snoring.

 

Drop the excess weight.

People who are overweight are two times more likely to snore than those who aren’t. The reason is simple, overweight people carry extra fat around their necks which narrows their airways and causes them to snore. So lose a couple of pounds and lose your noisy nighttime companion. Switching up your diet, getting some exercise and ironically enough sleep will help you lose weight.

(Via:https://www.sleepcycle.com/snoring/10-natural-snoring-remedies/)

 

Switch to other sleeping positions.

Sleeping on your back can cause your airways to become blocked or narrowed. If you notice that you snore while sleeping on your back it is time to switch up your sleeping position. Sleeping on your side is usually recommended. Old habits die hard so the odds are that as you drift deeper into sleep you’d roll unto your back again. The fix? Invest in a body pillow. A body pillow will help you maintain sleeping on your side. Another mean old trick is sewing tennis balls unto the back of your pajamas.

(Via:https://www.sleepcycle.com/snoring/10-natural-snoring-remedies/)

 

Reduce alcohol consumption and cigarette smoking.

If you drink alcohol habitually, especially before bed that might be the cause of your snoring. Drinking alcohol a couple of hours before you go to bed relaxes your throat muscles, causing you to snore. Regular smokers are also likely to snore. Smoking irritates your throat tissues leading to inflammation, that results in snores.

(Via:https://www.sleepcycle.com/snoring/10-natural-snoring-remedies/)

 

Increase water intake.

Staying hydrated is always a good idea, particularly for snorers. Dehydration leads to mucus forming in your nose which could make you snore. Drinking

Most Prevalent Sleep Disturbances

Originally at: https://snoringmouthpiecereview.org/zquiet/most-prevalent-sleep-disturbances

All of us need good quality and quantity of sleep. But unfortunately, not every one of us can get it. Society today compels us to work harder than we did yesterday. More time is spent on working than resting.  Sleep can sometimes be a luxury for some. But the truth of the matter is that we need as much sleep as we can get. Getting the enough number of hours of sleep is crucial and it should be of good quality. As in, you are having a deep sleep and not spending more time tossing and turning or waking up in the middle of the night.

 

Some people can easily fall asleep. Some others find it a chore. Some have a sound sleep while others don’t. Sleeping isn’t the same for everyone no matter how much we need it or get it. Sleeping can be inconvenient for others especially for those who have medical conditions. Here are some of the most common sleep disturbances.

 

Snoring. Snoring happens when your air passages get narrow.

About half of all people in the world snore at some point in their lives. More common in men, over 40 percent of adult men and 24 percent of adult women are habitual snorers. In more detail, snoring is the sound that comes from obstructed air movement in your throat when you breathe while sleeping. 

(Via:https://www.sleepcycle.com/sleep-disorders/the-most-common-sleep-disorders/)

 

Sleep apnea. Sleep apnea is also known as a stop in breathing while sleeping.

Sleep apnea is a potentially serious sleep disorder. People who go untreated stop breathing repeatedly during sleep. This can lead to the brain and the rest of the body not getting enough oxygen. Which in turn can lead to stroke, heart failure, diabetes, depression, and headaches.

(Via:https://www.sleepcycle.com/sleep-disorders/the-most-common-sleep-disorders/)

 

Insomnia. Sounds familiar? Like snoring, one probably has or will encounter this in their life.

Ever had trouble falling asleep? Or do you find yourself waking up in the middle of the night, unable to fall back to sleep? Is this something you experience more than three days a week? If so, you might be suffering from insomnia. Insomnia refers to habitual sleeplessness and is the most common sleep disorder in the world.

(Via:https://www.sleepcycle.com/sleep-disorders/the-most-common-sleep-disorders/)

 

Narcolepsy. This is a medical condition that involves extreme sleepiness during the day.

Also referred to as Excessive uncontrollable daytime sleepiness, narcolepsy causes overwhelming daytime sleepiness. It is a chronic sleep disorder affecting 1 in 2,000 to 3,000 people. The cause of narcolepsy is related to the loss of cells in the brain that secrete hypocretin. Hypocretin is a chemical in the

Get Yourself A Better Sleep By Following These Tips

Originally at: https://snoringmouthpiecereview.org/good-morning-snore-solution/get-yourself-a-better-sleep-by-following-these-tips

Life is busy. Could it get any busier? Yes. But can you have enough sleep every day? Yes as well.  Today’s active and bustling society may not rest, but you can. In fact, getting enough and good quality sleep has to be given more emphasis these days since getting busy is starting to be a norm.

 

Sleep is just as important as good nutrition and exercise. One can never truly call himself or herself healthy without any one of these three. Sleeping can actually lead to a healthy life. If you are having a hard time falling asleep or getting a good sleep, these tips will help you out.

 

Shut off the noise.

You may not recall the racket caused by yesterday’s midnight garbage pickup, but your body probably does. Even if you don’t wake up, noise can disrupt your slumber and cause restlessness, increased heart rate and blood pressure, and changes in breathing patterns…

(Via: https://www.health.com/sleep/advice-for-better-sleep?slide=525773#525773)

 

Have some aromatherapy.

Creating a bedtime ritual that includes diffusing (a process of dispersing) essential oils 30 minutes before sacking out is a simple and effective way to cue the body to rest, says Sara Panton, essential-oil expert and cofounder of Vitruvi. Not only are there certain scents that encourage drowsiness, but the very act of setting up a routine helps signal to your brain that it’s time to start shutting off.

(Via: https://www.health.com/sleep/advice-for-better-sleep?slide=525767#525767)

 

Be cool. Literally.

Body temperature regularly fluctuates throughout the day—it’s usually at its highest in the afternoon and lowest in the early a.m. So if your room is hot, your body will work all night to cool down—and if you’re sweating, you’re more likely to wake up. The sweet spot: 65 degrees, according to the National Sleep Foundation.

(Via: https://www.health.com/sleep/advice-for-better-sleep?slide=525770#525770)

 

Give your space a room to breathe. Exercise caution though. You might not want to open your windows for too long especially if there are insects and creepy crawlies that want to join you inside.

Room stuffiness can hike nasal congestion and hinder your ability to breathe while you doze. Per a study in the journal Indoor Air, people who kept their window open overnight felt more alert the next morning than they did when it had been kept closed. If you live in a city and opening your window exposes you to noise, crack it open for 15 minutes during the day instead. No windows? No problem. Invest in a plant like a peace lily, which naturally purifies air.

(Via: https://www.health.com/sleep/advice-for-better-sleep?slide=525782#525782)

 

Make the room darker earlier.

Not only does light send “stay awake” alerts to

Reasons Why Being A Night Person Is Not Good For Your Health

Originally at: https://snoringmouthpiecereview.org/snorerx/reasons-why-being-a-night-person-is-not-good-for-your-health

Many things can keep us up at night. It can be work that you took home as an assignment because your boss insists on having it done by morning. It can also be insomnia or a medical condition like anxiety. It can also be that you are doing a movie marathon on Netflix. Or maybe, you just like to be up at night and not during daylight. Whichever it is, it’s nowhere near good. This is so because studies have shown that the relationship with improper sleep-wake cycle and health issues are direct.

 

You’ll be at risk for higher blood pressure. You don’t have it in the family. You eat healthy meals. Therefore don’t let being a night owl break the chain.

In a 2013 study in the journal Chronobiology International, researchers found that “evening types” were  than “morning types” to have , even after they controlled for participants’ total amount of sleep and sleep quality.

(Via:https://www.health.com/sleep/health-risks-night-owl?slide=513065#513065)

 

You’ll have less time for exercise. Sleep is important. So is exercise. Don’t lose both.

Self-described night owls  than people who consider themselves early birds, according to a 2014 research abstract in the journal Sleep; they also report having more difficulty finding time to exercise and maintaining a regular exercise schedule.

(Via: https://www.health.com/sleep/health-risks-night-owl?slide=513071#513071)

 

You’re more likely to gain weight. Unless you want that, then this probably won’t be a problem.

Some experts believe that  disrupts the body’s natural overnight fasting period, which can interfere with its ability to burn fat. Night owls also happen to  per day than early birds, according to a 2011 study in the journal Obesity–248 more, on average–perhaps because willpower is lower when you’re tired and we  late at night.

(Via:https://www.health.com/sleep/health-risks-night-owl?slide=513077#513077)

 

You’re more at risk for diabetes type 2.

In one 2015 study, published in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism, men with evening chronotypes were more likely to have  (a condition in which the body loses muscle mass), compared to men with morning chronotypes.

Female night owls, compared with their early bird counterparts, tended to have more belly fat and a greater risk of metabolic syndrome—a cluster of conditions (like high blood pressure, , and high cholesterol) that increase a person’s risk for heart disease and diabetes.

(Via:https://www.health.com/sleep/health-risks-night-owl?slide=513086#513086)

 

Night sleep can also make it harder to manage.

For those who do go on to develop diabetes, being a night owl can make the condition more difficult to manage. A 2013 study in Diabetes Care found that, for people with type 2 diabetes, having a later bedtime is associated with —even after researchers

Science Approved Ways To Fall Asleep Easier

Originally at: https://snoringmouthpiecereview.org/good-morning-snore-solution/science-approved-ways-to-fall-asleep-easier

Sleep is a crucial form of rest for the whole body. Everyone needs it. But sometimes, not everyone gets it. Other than staying up for long purposely because of work or other activities, one can’t go to sleep simply because he or she has insomnia. Insomnia can be caused by a number of factors. The most commons ones are medications or medical conditions that disturb the sleep cycle. But if you’re not under any of these, then what’s been keeping you up may be anxiety.

Unless certain medical conditions or medications are the cause of your sleeplessness, the most common culprit is anxiety, says Lisa Meltzer, an education scholar for the National Sleep Foundation and associate professor of pediatrics at National Jewish Health in Denver.

(Via:https://www.huffpost.com/entry/15-ways-to-fall-asleep-faster_n_55dde3e7e4b04ae497054470)

 

Anxiety makes you too aware of your surroundings. Which makes sense. The unease, worry or fear can sometimes keep you up more than caffeine ever could. If you are having a hard time relaxing, these evidence-based ways to fall asleep easier can help you.

 

Compel yourself to stay awake.

Is there anything reverse psychology isn’t good for? In this case, it may alleviate excessive sleep anxiety. A small study conducted at the University of Glasgow found that sleep-onset insomniacs who were instructed to lay in bed and try to stay awake with their eyes open fell asleep quicker than participants told to fall asleep without this “paradoxical intention” (PI). Participants in the PI group fell asleep easier and showed less sleep performance anxiety.

(Via:https://www.huffpost.com/entry/15-ways-to-fall-asleep-faster_n_55dde3e7e4b04ae497054470)

 

Get your hands and brain working by doing something for 10 minutes.

“This is a stimulus control theory,” says Meltzer. “Everything in life has a stimulus value, even your bed,” meaning your body should recognize that lying in bed means it’s time to go to sleep. To give your bed that value, the only things you should be doing in it are sleep and sex, she explains. “Getting out of bed if you can’t sleep is the hardest one to do, but it’s so important. If you’re spending 10 hours in bed, but only sleeping six, that’s really bad. Your bed becomes a place for thinking, worrying, watching TV, and not for sleeping.”

(Via:https://www.huffpost.com/entry/15-ways-to-fall-asleep-faster_n_55dde3e7e4b04ae497054470)

 

Keep your clock away. But why?

You toss and turn, trying to fall asleep, watching the minutes tick toward morning on your bedside clock. Does this scenario sound familiar? Do yourself a favor: Hide the clock. Constantly checking the time only increases your stress, making it harder to turn down the dial on your nervous system and fall asleep. “If you stare at