7 Common Causes Of Snoring

Originally at: https://snoringmouthpiecereview.org/zquiet/causes-of-snoring

Snoring is a big turn off. It can drive anybody nuts. The last thing you need at the end of a busy day is to hear someone snore. That’s not going to get you any sleep at all.

If you’re the one who snores, chances are, you won’t get any sleep as well. Snorers are likely to wake to their own snores.

Snorers with severe sleep apnea often find themselves waking up gasping for air. People with milder cases of sleep apnea may only wake themselves up just a bit, not enough to remember in the morning but enough to severely disrupt the much-needed sleep cycle.

(Via:https://www.huffingtonpost.com/jon-hotchkiss/why-doesnt-my-snoring-wake-me-up_b_4893099.html)

Since snoring can affect anybody’s sleeping pattern, it makes a lot sense to know the common causes of it. Here are 7 common causes of snoring.

Your mouth anatomy could be the cause of your snoring.

Having a low, thick soft palate can narrow your airway. People who are overweight may have extra tissues in the back of their throats that may narrow their airways. Likewise, if the triangular piece of tissue hanging from the soft palate (uvula) is elongated, airflow can be obstructed and vibration increased.

(Via:https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/snoring/symptoms-causes/syc-20377694)

Think twice about drinking that bottle of beer. Alcohol and other medications can induce snoring.

The root cause of snoring is vibration of the tissues while breathing. Some medications as well as alcohol can lead to enhanced relaxation of muscles during sleep. As the muscles of the palate, tongue, neck, and pharynx relax more, the airway collapses more. This leads to a smaller airway and greater tissue vibration. Some medications encourage a deeper level of sleep, which also can worsen snoring.

(Via:https://www.medicinenet.com/snoring/article.htm#why_is_snoring_a_problem)

If your nose is clogged, the natural tendency is to breathe through the mouth. When you sleep with a clogged nose, you’re most likely to snore.

A blocked nose – due to a cold, allergies, polyps or anatomical abnormality – creates the need for greater suction pressures to draw air into the lungs when breathing, which further narrow the airway. Mouth opening often occurs when the nose is blocked during sleep, which itself can cause snoring (via airway anatomy and pressure changes).

(Via:http://theconversation.com/health-check-is-snoring-anything-to-worry-about-68142)

While men are more likely to snore, older women aren’t spared at all. It’s quite interesting to know that menopause is a common cause of snoring.

Women become more likely to snore and develop OSA after the menopause, because of lower levels of oestrogen and progesterone, which help protect and support muscles around the airways during child-bearing years.

(Via:https://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-2538836/Its-not-just-overweight-men-wreck-halfs-sleep-Could-menopause-making-wife-snore-worse-you.html)

Smoking causes a lot of health problems. …

Use NOSTRILS to Sleep Better Today

Originally at: https://doctorstevenpark.com/use-nostrils-to-sleep-better-today

A consequence of being a sleep doctor is that I constantly get bombarded with questions about sleep by complete strangers at parties, gatherings, and especially on airplanes. It seems that almost everyone I meet has or knows someone that can’t sleep. They’ve tried all the typical methods and hacks recommend by friends or found online, with minimal to no success. At this point, I use NOSTRILS as a reminder of the 8 important steps to help those of you that are struggling to fall or stay asleep.

Before I describe the 8 things to consider, my basic premise is that all modern human have smaller jaws and airways, predisposing everyone to various degrees of breathing problems at night. If you had wisdom teeth removed, or needed braces, then you’re at risk. Crooked teeth comes from smaller jaws, which leads to more narrow airways from the tip of your nose to your voice box. Breathing problems result during sleep, leading to various physical ailments that are so common in our society today. This is what I talk about in my book, Sleep Interrupted: A physician reveals the #1 reason why so many of us are sick and tired.

Nose

Being able to breathe optimally through your nose is the single most important thing to start with. If you can’t breathe through your nose, this will force you to mouth breathe, which causes more obstructed breathing, as explained in my last post. If you are breathing well through your nose but suddenly suffer from an allergy attack, you begin to toss and turn, because your nose is more stuffy. This is due to the vacuum effect that’s created in your throat like what happens when you suck on a straw with the other end pinched closed. (Read my free report on How to Unstuff Your Stuffy Nose.)

Oxygen

Getting more oxygen is commonly touted as being more healthy. This is a myth.

  • The air you breathe has plenty of oxygen that’s available to your body. When you stop breathing multiple times at night, it creates a stress response that shuts down blood flow to your gut, your reproductive organs, and higher-level areas of your brain. As this problem worsens, it can carry over into the daytime, leading to poor oxygenation of tissues that are required for optimal health. 
  • Another important process that lowers oxygen to your body occurs when you don’t breathe through your nose. The nose makes a gas called nitric oxide, which dilates blood vessels. Once this gas reaches your lungs, it relaxes smooth muscles in your blood vessels allowing more oxygen absorption. Bypassing the

Is it Possible To Stop Snoring?

Originally at: https://snoringmouthpiecereview.org/snorerx/stop-snoring

Yes! It is possible to stop snoring. If snoring is becoming a serious problem, then it’s time to do something about it.

It’s not easy to live with someone who snores. It could instantly take a toll on a relationship.

Snoring can be a big stress for your relationship. In a study more than 50% of couples admitted that snoring leads to serious arguments and is affecting their relationship. 80% of them said that sometimes they have to sleep in the other room for a sound sleep. Snoring affects your relationships as it is frustrating situation for both the partners. Since snoring disturbs your sleep it directly leads to situations that can diminish affection amongst the spouse.

(Via:https://www.onlymyhealth.com/how-snoring-affects-your-relationships-1303813482)

Snoring is a common problem for almost everybody. Although it’s widely believed that snoring affects older people more, both young and old are affected just the same.

Any person can snore. Frequently, people who do not regularly snore will report snoring after a viral illness, after drinking alcohol, or when taking some medications.

People who snore can have any body type. We frequently think of a large man with a thick neck as a snorer. However, a thin woman with a small neck can snore just as loudly. In general, as people get older and as they gain weight, snoring will worsen.

(Via:https://www.medicinenet.com/snoring/article.htm#how_common_is_snoring)

To understand why snoring affects almost everybody, one has to know what snoring is. Snoring happens when breathing is obstructed. Unfortunately, that can happen in a lot of ways. One way to obstruct breathing is by simply sleeping on the back.

Scientists say there are two types of snorers: those who snore only when they sleep on their backs, and those who do it regardless of their position. After sleep researchers in Israel examined more than 2,000 sleep apnea patients, for example, they found that 54 percent were “positional,” meaning they snored only when asleep on their backs. The rest were “nonpositional.”

(Via:https://www.nytimes.com/2011/04/19/health/19really.html)

Smoking and drinking alcohol can also cause one to snore. When it comes to smoking, it’s not just the smoker who is prone to snore. Even the passive smoker can end up smoking.

That’s because smoking — both active and passive — makes it more likely you’ll snore the night away, according to a study in the October issue of the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

“Smoking is a common cause of snoring. Even passive smoke can induce snoring,” said study co-author Dr. Karl Franklin, a professor at University Hospital in Umea, Sweden, who added that the most important take-away message from this study

Sleep, Interrupted Book Now Available as Audiobook

Originally at: https://doctorstevenpark.com/sleep-interrupted-book-now-available-as-audiobook

I’m pleased to announce that my Amazon best-selling book, Sleep Interrupted: A physician reveals the #1 reason why so many of us are sick and tired, now has an audiobook option. Sorry it took so long.

You can find it as an Audible audiobook on Amazon.

If you are still struggling to find the reason for your chronic fatigue, daily headaches, anxiety, unexplained weight gain or hormonal fluctuations, then this audiobook has the answers you’re looking for. If you have friends or family that may benefit from this important information, please forward this information along.

After listening to this audiobook, please give me your honest feedback below. What other topics or conditions do you want to hear more about? The only way for me to provide useful information is by listening to your concerns and questions.

The post Sleep, Interrupted Book Now Available as Audiobook appeared first on Doctor Steven Y. Park, MD | New York, NY | Integrative Solutions for Obstructive Sleep Apnea, Upper Airway Resistance Syndrome, and Snoring.

from Doctor Steven Y. Park, MD | New York, NY | Integrative Solutions for Obstructive Sleep Apnea, Upper Airway Resistance Syndrome, and SnoringBlog – Doctor Steven Y. Park, MD | New York, NY | Integrative Solutions for Obstructive Sleep Apnea, Upper Airway Resistance Syndrome, and Snoring https://doctorstevenpark.com/sleep-interrupted-book-now-available-as-audiobook…

Here’s A Simple Cure For Snoring

Originally at: https://snoringmouthpiecereview.org/good-morning-snore-solution/cure-for-snoring

There’s a cure for snoring. It’s as simple as wearing an oral device while sleeping. Oral devices or oral appliances can improve the airflow in the mouth by keeping the jaw forward. This, in turn, lessens the chances of snoring.

They push the tongue and jaw forward, which makes the airway larger and improves airflow. This also decreases the chance that tissue will collapse and narrow the airway when you breathe in. Examples include a mandibular repositioning device (MRD) or a tongue retaining device.

(Via:https://www.healthlinkbc.ca/health-topics/hw48677)

Oral devices are very simple and easy to wear. It can even be worn while talking and drinking some water. The best part is that they work quite well. It spares the snorer from undergoing surgery.

Opening the airway through surgery is no joke. Wearing a continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) mask is also an alternative but it could be a hassle, considering it requires a machine.

Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy is a common treatment for obstructive sleep apnea.

A CPAP machine uses a hose and mask or nosepiece to deliver constant and steady air pressure.

Common problems with CPAP include a leaky mask, trouble falling asleep, stuffy nose and a dry mouth.

(Via:https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/sleep-apnea/in-depth/cpap/art-20044164)

Wearing an oral device is a less painful alternative. Needless to say, it’s also a very convenient alternative. It just has to be worn while sleeping and that’s it.

These days, oral devices are worth considering. Contrary to what people think, oral devices do not actually cause jaw pain. As a matter of fact, wearing an oral device does more than just open the airway. It also prevents the teeth from grinding.

Teeth grinding and clenching are part of a condition called bruxism, which is a sleep-related movement disorder that can cause a variety of problems, such as tooth pain, jaw pain, and sore gums. It can also damage your teeth.

Wearing a mouthguard while your sleep can help keep your top and bottom teeth separated so they don’t damage each other from the pressure of grinding or clenching.

(Via:https://www.healthline.com/health/mouth-guard#types)

A good example of an oral device that can protect the teeth from grinding is a boil-and-bite mouthpiece.

Boil and bite mouth protectors also can be bought at many sporting goods stores and may offer a better fit than stock mouth protectors. The “boil and bite” mouth guard is made from thermoplastic material. It is placed in hot water to soften, then placed in the mouth and shaped around the teeth using finger and tongue pressure.

(Via:https://www.webmd.com/oral-health/guide/mouth-guards#1)

Keep in mind that not all boil-and-bite mouthpieces are recommended …

Upcoming Movie, Ode to Joy, Featuring Narcolepsy with Cataplexy Portrayal

Originally at: http://julieflygare.com/upcoming-movie-ode-to-joy-featuring-narcolepsy-with-cataplexy-portrayal/

Today, Project Sleep issued the following public statement after receiving many questions from community members about the upcoming feature-length movie, Ode to Joy. I look forward to sharing more news as soon as we can. Thank you for your incredible support of Project Sleep’s efforts to improve outcomes for people with narcolepsy through our programming including the Rising Voices fo Narcolepsy leadership training program, Narcolepsy: Not Alone campaign, Jack & Julie Narcolepsy Scholarship and our exciting new effort joining 21 other organizations around the world to establish the inaugural World Narcolepsy Day for Sept. 22, 2019!!

Project Sleep’s Public Statement: Narcolepsy Portrayal in Film, Ode to Joy

Los Angeles, CA, April 10, 2019 — Project Sleep would like to inform our supporters and the narcolepsy community that we are aware of Ode to Joy — an upcoming feature film depicting a main character portrayal of narcolepsy with cataplexy. The portrayal was inspired by a 2010 NPR This American Life segment titled “I’ve Fallen In Love and I Can’t Get Up.”

Project Sleep is committed to advancing our bold goals to increase the public’s knowledge of narcolepsy to 80% by 2025; reduce delays in proper diagnosis from 8-15 years to two years by 2030; and reduce stigma for those living with narcolepsy. We understand the primary goal of film is entertainment, while also recognizing the role entertainment plays in helping to shape societal perceptions of health conditions like narcolepsy. We have been in conversation with the producers over the past few months about possible opportunities to work together to raise awareness. We look forward to continuing this conversation with the film’s team and continuing to do everything we can to amplify the voices of people living with narcolepsy and their loved ones through our organization’s programming and public relations efforts. 

Sign up for our e-updates to be the first to know about important news and program announcements.

from Blog – Julie Flygare http://julieflygare.com/upcoming-movie-ode-to-joy-featuring-narcolepsy-with-cataplexy-portrayal/…

7 Supplements to Fight Fatigue and Brain Fog

Originally at: https://doctorstevenpark.com/7-supplements-to-fight-fatigue-and-brain-fog

In this episodes, Kathy and I explain why certain supplements are essential to good gut health and brain function, as well as to potentially prevent damage from untreated obstructive sleep apnea or upper airway resistance syndrome. We end the discussion by exposing a major myth about a popular supplement. 

Download mp3 | Subscribe

Show Notes 

Sleep Breathing Paradigm in Sleep, Interrupted

Inflammation and OSA article

Why Zebras Don’t Get Ulcers(Talks about stress)

Glyphosate podcast

Functions of the liver

Vitamin D podcastwith Dr. Gominak

Dr. Deborah Wardly UARS and ANP paperand effects on magnesium

Sleep apnea and brain damage (Dr. Ron Harper interview)

Sleep deprivation and effects on gut biome article

Dr. Mercola’sinformation on probiotics

Ferritin level and limb movements article

The post 7 Supplements to Fight Fatigue and Brain Fog appeared first on Doctor Steven Y. Park, MD | New York, NY | Integrative Solutions for Obstructive Sleep Apnea, Upper Airway Resistance Syndrome, and Snoring.

from Doctor Steven Y. Park, MD | New York, NY | Integrative Solutions for Obstructive Sleep Apnea, Upper Airway Resistance Syndrome, and SnoringBlog – Doctor Steven Y. Park, MD | New York, NY | Integrative Solutions for Obstructive Sleep Apnea, Upper Airway Resistance Syndrome, and Snoring https://doctorstevenpark.com/7-supplements-to-fight-fatigue-and-brain-fog…

Warning: A Snoring Partner Shortens Your Life

Originally at: https://snoringmouthpiecereview.org/good-morning-snore-solution/snoring-partner-shortens-your-life

Snoring causes troubles for couples. It’s not just the snorer who is in danger, so is the partner.

Sleeping with someone who snores puts you in real danger. This is not to scare you or anything but a snoring partner shortens your life.

It’s true that sleeping with a snorer can take a toll on your health. People who sleep next to snorers report high levels of fatigue and sleepiness and may even be at higher risk for hearing loss.

(Via:https://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2009/06/11/sleeping-with-a-snorer/)

What’s worse than waking up in the middle of the night because of a loud snore? It’s staying up against your will because you just can’t go back to sleep anymore. Who in the world can go back to sleep with such an annoying noise?

The blasting sound that goes right into your ear is more than just irritating. The truth is, it’s deafening for both you and the snorer. Yes, you and your snoring partner are both at risk of losing the sense of hearing. Here is the reason why:

Not all snores are created equal. The average snore is about 40 decibels, about the same level of noise you would hear in a library (think consistent whispering and quiet chattering).

Via:https://www.bustle.com/articles/76670-5-things-you-should-know-if-your-partner-snores-like-a-jackhammer-or-has-sleep-apnea)

If you’re a light sleeper, a whisper could easily wake and keep you up as well. After all, a noise is a noise. It doesn’t really matter how loud it is.

In a worst-case scenario, you could be sleeping with someone who snores very loud. That could be very bad for both you and your snoring partner.

But believe it or not: the human snore can roar. In fact, one of Britain’s loudest snorers is a grandmother of four who snores every night at 111.6 decibels. That’s louder than a jackhammer, a subway train, a hand drill, power mower, snowmobile, motorcycle, and a power saw—and just eight decibels lower than the sound produced by a low-flying jet plane.

Via:https://www.bustle.com/articles/76670-5-things-you-should-know-if-your-partner-snores-like-a-jackhammer-or-has-sleep-apnea)

Now, that’s loud. That could really damage your hearing.

Research shows that the internal vibration in the inner ear can be high enough to cause damage to the snorer’s own hearing! Perhaps less surprisingly, some bed partners of noisy snorers have been shown to have a substantial incidence of partial deafness in the ear that faces their snoring bedmate.

Via:https://www.bustle.com/articles/76670-5-things-you-should-know-if-your-partner-snores-like-a-jackhammer-or-has-sleep-apnea)

It’s not just your sense of hearing that’s endangered. You see, a snoring partner shortens your life because you don’t get any sleep at all.

Often, snoring is due to obstructive sleep apnea, which is characterized by episodes of interrupted breathing during sleep, which leads

Sleep Talk: Episode 37 – Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

Originally at: https://sleephub.com.au/podcast-37/

Episode 37: Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

Symptoms of tiredness, fatigue and sleepiness are common in chronic fatigue syndrome. How can these symptoms be addressed and sleep improved in people with fatigue syndromes? In this episode we tackle these questions with the help of Nathan Butler of Active Health Clinic.

Dr Moira Junge (Health Psychologist) and Dr David Cunnington (Sleep Physician) host the monthly podcast, Sleep Talk, talking all things sleep.

Leave a review and subscribe via iTunes

Audio Timeline / Chapters:

  • 00:00 – 01:40 Introduction
  • 01:40 – 26:43 Theme – Chronic Fatigue Syndrome
  • 26:43 – 27:28 Clinical Tip
  • 27:28 – 34:07 Pick of the Month
  • 34:07 – 35:05 What’s Coming Up?

Next episode: Sleep in Pregnancy

Links mentioned in the podcast: 

Presenters:

Guest interviews:

Nathan Butler

Nathan Butler is an accredited exercise physiologist with over 15 years experience working as the coordinator of specialist inpatient and outpatient programs at the Austin Hospital in Melbourne and at the Royal Free Hospital in London in the areas of CFS as well as cardiac, respiratory and orthopaedic rehabilitation. Whilst in the UK Nathan was involved in the PACE study which investigated treatment modalities for CFS and the study was recently published in the Lancet. In 2008 Nathan established Active Health Clinic with his values of long term self management through knowledge, compassion and trust leading to Active Health Clinic being a leader in it’s field.

Connect with Nathan on Twitter, or follow Active Health Clinic on Facebook

Regular hosts:

Dr Moira JungeDr Moira Junge is a health psychologist working in the sleep field, who has considerable experience working with people with sleeping difficulties in a multidisciplinary practice using a team-based approach. Moira is actively involved with the Australasian Sleep Association (ASA) and a board member of the Sleep Health Foundation. She has presented numerous workshops for psychologists and is involved with Monash University with teaching and supervision commitments. She is one of the founders and clinic directors at Yarraville Health Group which was established in 1998. In addition to her expertise in sleep disorders, her other areas of interest and expertise include smoking cessation, psychological adjustment to chronic illness, and grief and loss issues.

 

Dr David CunningtonDr David Cunnington is a sleep physician and director of Melbourne Sleep Disorders Centre, and co-founder and contributor to SleepHub. David trained in sleep medicine both in Australia and …

Dangers of Snoring Everybody Should Be Aware Of

Originally at: https://snoringmouthpiecereview.org/good-morning-snore-solution/dangers-of-snoring

Snoring is a serious matter. It’s more than just the snorting sound one makes when asleep. Here’s what happens when we snore.

While we are asleep, turbulent airflow can cause the tissues of the palate (roof of the mouth) and throat to vibrate, giving rise to snoring. Essentially, snoring is a sound resulting from turbulent airflow that causes tissues to vibrate during sleep.

(Via:https://www.medicinenet.com/snoring/article.htm#how_common_is_snoring)

Given the fact that there’s some turbulent airflow that causes snoring, it’s really not enough to just acknowledge it. Snoring should be treated as soon as possible.

People who snore—and the partners who must listen to their snoring at night—usually have no problem acknowledging that snoring is disruptive and uncomfortable. But most don’t look for actual treatment for their snoring, particularly if it is not accompanied by obstructive sleep apnea, a serious sleep disorder that is characterized by interruptions to breathing during sleep.

Snoring—with or without sleep apnea—is a very real health concern. Snoring is a sign of disrupted sleep, which can lead to many health problems. And new research suggests that snoring itself may increase the risk of cardiovascular disease.

(Via:https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/sleep-newzzz/201302/snoring-may-be-warning-serious-health-risk)

Snoring, is no doubt, dangerous to the cardiovascular system. It can eventually damage the heart. According to the associate medical director for the Sleep Clinic at Harvard-affiliated Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Dr. Lawrence Epstein, it could pose as serious threat to the health of the heart.

Sleep apnea does more than interrupt your slumber. It could also threaten your heart health. “Apnea is a risk factor for the development of high blood pressure, and high blood pressure tends to lead to cardiovascular disease,” Dr. Epstein says.

(Via:https://www.health.harvard.edu/heart-health/why-snoring-could-be-a-sign-your-heart-is-at-risk)

No, Dr. Epstein isn’t kidding at all. You know why? Apparently, sleep apnea can actually cause the snorer to stop breathing.

People with obstructive sleep apnea stop breathing for 10 to 20 seconds while they sleep; this can occur from a few to hundreds of times a night.

(Via:https://healthblog.uofmhealth.org/heart-health/how-chronic-snoring-can-cause-heart-disease)

While it doesn’t necessarily mean that people who snore suffer from sleep apnea, it’s safer to seek treatment as soon as possible.

Snoring doesn’t occur in every case of sleep apnea, and all people who snore don’t have sleep apnea, but anyone who is told they snore should consider obstructive sleep apnea as a possible cause.

(Via:https://healthblog.uofmhealth.org/heart-health/how-chronic-snoring-can-cause-heart-disease)

It’s time to really take snoring seriously, considering the fatal effects of it on the heart. If the heart goes, then the whole body goes. Why wait for that to happen? Eliminating the apnea could lessen the risks of cardiovascular issues.

Although the research on sleep apnea treatments