Can This Smart Strap Actually Stop Snoring?

Originally at: https://snoringmouthpiecereview.org/blog/can-this-smart-strap-actually-stop-snoring

Snoring is such a big deal nowadays. Well, it should be. Considering the high percentage of habitual snorers these days, it’s high time we take snoring seriously.

According to research, 40-percent of adult men and 24-percent of adult women snore habitually. It’s cited as a key issue in preventing people from getting a solid night’s rest, either because they themselves are snoring, or the person next to them are.

(Via: https://www.slashgear.com/philips-sleepsmart-snoring-relief-band-health-implications-sleep-apnoea-26574840/)

Snoring not just affects the snorer. It also affects other people who are bothered by the loud noise. It’s hard to sleep with someone who snores. No one gets quality sleep with a snorer around. That pretty much contributes to the reason why snoring is such a big deal these days.

It all sounds faintly ridiculous, but snoring is a big deal – both in terms of annual relief spending, and for potential long term health implications. Snoring can be a strong risk factor for hypertension, for instance, while if left untreated it can eventually lead to Obstructive Sleep Apnoea, or OSA. That’s where the walls of the throat narrow during sleep, making it harder to breathe.

(Via: https://www.slashgear.com/philips-sleepsmart-snoring-relief-band-health-implications-sleep-apnoea-26574840/)

OSA is a serious disease. It can lead to other health issues that could be deadly at some point.

Over time, OSA can lead to an increased risk of stroke or heart attack, to atrial fibrillation, and even make it more likely that you’ll develop type 2 diabetes.

(Via: https://www.slashgear.com/philips-sleepsmart-snoring-relief-band-health-implications-sleep-apnoea-26574840/)

That explains why there is an urgent need to stop snoring.

Stopping snoring isn’t going to instantly prevent all that from happening, but it’s a good first step, and doctors typically look at snoring as an early symptom that there’s something going wrong when you’re in bed.

(Via: https://www.slashgear.com/philips-sleepsmart-snoring-relief-band-health-implications-sleep-apnoea-26574840/)

The question is, can a smart strap like the Phillips’ Smart Snoring Relief Band actually stop snoring? Before we answer that, let’s take a close look at it first.

The latest addition to the company’s sleep-focused range, the Philips SleepSmart Snoring Relief Band replaces giving your bedmate a swift kick when they’re making too much noise.

Unlike straps that claim to keep your nasal passages more open, or bizarre headgear, the snoring relief band takes a more straightforward approach. People typically snore when they’re lying on their front or back, but not when they’re on their side.

So, Philips’ band basically tracks when you’re lying on your back, and encourages you to shift to your side. To do that, it promises to gently vibrate. Not enough to actually wake you up, but just enough of a disturbance to get you to change position.

A Sad Day for Sleep Medicine

Originally at: https://doctorstevenpark.com/a-sad-day-for-sleep-medicine Dr. Christian Guilleminault

I was extremely saddened to hear that Dr. Christian Guilleminault, one of the major pioneers in the field of sleep medicine, recent passed away at the age of 80. He was the first to coin the term, obstructive sleep apnea syndrome. A prolific researcher with countless publications, he was a mentor and friend to numerous sleep medicine and other related healthcare professionals. 

Dr. Guilleminault radically changed my perspective on how I look at sleep apnea when I read his landmark article on upper airway resistance syndrome (UARS). He showed in sleepy, thin young men and women that they can stop breathing and wake up dozens of time every hour without meeting the formal criteria for apneas. This was shown using esophageal pressure catheters, which detected progressively lower chest pressures with successive breaths, ending with brain wave arousals from deep to light sleep.

UARS patients present differently from classic sleep apnea patients, with severe chronic fatigue (but not drowsiness), headaches, anxiety depression, low blood pressure, cold hands and feet, hypothyroidism, or digestive issues. 

He was also one of the first to describe sleep apnea in young children, attributed sleep-walking to sleep apnea, and was instrumental in collaborating with surgeons at Stanford University legitimizing surgical options for sleep apnea. He was influential in shifting sleep doctors’ thinking from looking at sleep apnea mainly due to obesity to craniofacial factors. 

I was privileged to have interviewed Dr. Guilleminault about UARS many years ago on my podcast. To hear the recording, please click here.

Thank you Dr. Guillminault for opening my eyes to the importance of good breathing for good sleep. 

The post A Sad Day for Sleep Medicine appeared first on Doctor Steven Y. Park, MD | New York, NY | Integrative Solutions for Obstructive Sleep Apnea, Upper Airway Resistance Syndrome, and Snoring.

from Doctor Steven Y. Park, MD | New York, NY | Integrative Solutions for Obstructive Sleep Apnea, Upper Airway Resistance Syndrome, and SnoringBlog – Doctor Steven Y. Park, MD | New York, NY | Integrative Solutions for Obstructive Sleep Apnea, Upper Airway Resistance Syndrome, and Snoring https://doctorstevenpark.com/a-sad-day-for-sleep-medicine…

When Snoring Becomes Deadly

Originally at: https://snoringmouthpiecereview.org/good-morning-snore-solution/when-snoring-becomes-deadly

We know that snoring kills. If it isn’t addressed and treated, it can lead to a lot of health complications that can eventually kill the snorer.

However, we don’t really hear a lot of stories on snorers being murdered for the obvious and annoying reason that they snore. Hopefully, there aren’t a lot of stories on it but unfortunately, there’s one that came out on May 1.

A woman at a UK hospital died two weeks after a hotheaded patient whacked her in the head because she was annoyed by her snoring, a report said.

(Via: https://nypost.com/2019/05/01/woman-dies-in-hospital-after-patient-attacks-her-for-snoring/)

Now, that is one sad news. Needless to say, it’s a senseless murder. How could anyone kill anyone and for what? For snoring? It’s totally absurd but it’s true. It happened.

Mom of five Eileen Bunting, 64, was attacked and hit in the head with a cup while she was in a hospital bed at the Hull Royal Infirmary in Hull, England, on March 22, The Sun reported.

Bunting, who was left with a bloody gash on her forehead, was slated to be released from the hospital the day after the attack, but after she was assaulted, her health quickly declined.

She died April 4, according to the news outlet.

(Via: https://nypost.com/2019/05/01/woman-dies-in-hospital-after-patient-attacks-her-for-snoring/)

Apparently, Bunting’s snoring had become a serious issue for one patient who just couldn’t take it anymore. The sad part is that the attack seemed like it was well-laid out.

The victim’s son told local media that he believed the assault was a “premeditated” attack after it was discovered that the unidentified patient who went after his mother had tied the hospital room’s door handles together to prevent anyone from coming inside.

“The nurses must have been doing the rounds, noticed the doors were shut and found my mom full of blood and her stood over her with a cup,” Bunting’s son, Mark Bunting, told Hull Live, according to the report.
“The doors had been pulled to and tied together with a blanket and then she proceeded to attack my mom. It was premeditated,” the devastated son said.

(Via: https://nypost.com/2019/05/01/woman-dies-in-hospital-after-patient-attacks-her-for-snoring/)

It seems pretty surreal to think that anyone could kill for the simple reason of snoring. Based on the news report, it can really happen. A patient actually got fed up with the snoring and decided to do something about it. Sad to say, that something was a deadly way to deal with the snoring. Now that is downright scary.

Bunting’s husband, Philip, was adamant that the woman who attacked his wife did it over her snoring.

“Apparently the night before, another patient said the

How Sleep Affects Your Hormones [Podcast 67]

Originally at: https://doctorstevenpark.com/hormones

In this episode, Kathy and I will talk about a very common topic, hormones. In particular, how lack of sleep can negatively affect all your hormones, which can potentially aggravate weight gain, poor energy, and increased stress.

Download mp3  |  Subscribe |  Transcript

Shownotes

Hormones covered:

  • Thyroid
  • Estrogen and progesterone
  • Cortisol
  • Melatonin
  • Atrial natriuretic peptide
  • Insulin
  • Grehlin and leptin
  • Vitamin D
  • Growth hormone

Feeling Fat, Fuzzy or Frazzled, by Dr. Richard Shames

Atrial Natriuretic Peptide article by Dr. Deb Wardly

Vitamin D interview with Dr. Stasha Gominak

Sicker, fatter, Poorer by Dr. Leo Trasande

Sleep, Interrupted by Dr. Steven Y. Park

Second Spring by Dr. Maoshing Ni

The Woman Code by Alyssa Vitti 

The Wisdom of Menopause by Dr. Christiane Northrup 

Keep Swimming Clip in Finding Nemo

https://doctorstevenpark.com/hormones

Breathe Better Sleep Better Live better Podcast 

The post How Sleep Affects Your Hormones [Podcast 67] appeared first on Doctor Steven Y. Park, MD | New York, NY | Integrative Solutions for Obstructive Sleep Apnea, Upper Airway Resistance Syndrome, and Snoring.

from Doctor Steven Y. Park, MD | New York, NY | Integrative Solutions for Obstructive Sleep Apnea, Upper Airway Resistance Syndrome, and SnoringBlog – Doctor Steven Y. Park, MD | New York, NY | Integrative Solutions for Obstructive Sleep Apnea, Upper Airway Resistance Syndrome, and Snoring https://doctorstevenpark.com/hormones…

Snoring: A Problem For Both Men And Women

Originally at: https://snoringmouthpiecereview.org/good-morning-snore-solution/snoring-a-problem-for-both-men-and-women

Ladies, listen up. If you find yourselves complaining about how bad your boyfriend or hubby snores, stop for a moment. Make sure that you don’t snore because if you do, well, your boyfriend or hubby could be complaining about it as well. Be careful with what you say because you could be a snorer as well.

It turns out that men are not the only ones that snore according to a new study.

“We found that although no difference in snoring intensity was found between genders, women tend to underreport the fact that they snore and to underestimate the loudness of their snoring,” said Dr. Nimrod Maimon.

The study found that 88 percent of women snore, but only 72 percent admit to doing so. 93 percent of men both snored and reported snoring.

(Via: http://www.wlsam.com/2019/04/30/snoring-not-just-an-issue-for-men/)

So, ladies, face it. You probably snore as well. Maybe not as loud as your partner but you probably snore as well. Admitting it can be hard but it’s a good start if you really want to solve your snoring problem.

No one wants to admit that he or she is a snorer. After all, snoring is not something anyone would be proud of doing. It’s embarrassing to snore. For a lady to snore, it’s a total turn off.

The thing is, everybody snores. It’s a fact. No one can deny that. So instead of putting the blame on your boyfriend or husband, take the first step to see if you snore as well. Then deal with it.

Ladies, just because your snoring isn’t as loud as your partner’s doesn’t mean you shouldn’t get any help. The fact is, there are real dangers to consider with snoring.

“The fact that women reported snoring less often and described it as milder may be one of the barriers preventing women from reaching sleep clinics for a sleep study,” Dr. Maimon said.
Snoring can be due to sleep apnea, a sleeping disorder that can lead to an array of health issues.

(Via: http://www.wlsam.com/2019/04/30/snoring-not-just-an-issue-for-men/)

Snoring can lead to a lot of health problems. Before getting to that point, it’s best to treat it as soon as possible.

Going to a sleep clinic is a good way to treat snoring but it can take some time. Most likely, you don’t have a lot of time to spare. There is another alternative for you. It’s actually a more practical way to deal with your snoring.

Wearing a snoring mouthpiece while sleeping can really help a lot. If you’re not familiar with snoring mouthpieces, then it’s time to familiarize yourself with them. For starters, snoring …

Could These Mouth Workouts Stop Snoring?

Originally at: https://snoringmouthpiecereview.org/snorerx/could-these-mouth-workouts-stop-snoring

Have you ever heard of mouth workouts? Apparently, they exist and they’re supposed to help stop snoring. The question is, do they actually work?

Before we get into that, here’s a little trivia for you. Did you know that men snore more than women? Yes, they do.

Around 40 per cent of men over 30 snore and around 30 per cent of women do.

(Via: https://www.thesun.co.uk/fabulous/8842466/simple-workout-stop-snoring/)

Of course, that doesn’t delete the fact that women snore as well. There just less women who snore.

It’s really not a matter of who snores more or who snores less. The point is, there is always someone who snores and that could be you. Snoring is not something that we should take lightly.

If left untreated, it can turn into sleep apnea – a potentially life-threatening sleeping disorder which sees people have heart attacks in the middle of the night.

(Via: https://www.thesun.co.uk/fabulous/8842466/simple-workout-stop-snoring/)

So, if you snore or you know of someone who snores, it’s time to incorporate some mouth workouts before going to sleep.

Because one expert maintains that not only is snoring a voluntary habit but also that it can be treated with a five-minute workout.

Mike Dilkes is an ear, nose and throat surgeon at London’s Hospital of St John and St Elizabeth, and he’s been telling the Telegraph that while snoring is “not a habit you may choose to have…(it’s) one you can choose to stop”.

(Via: https://www.thesun.co.uk/fabulous/8842466/simple-workout-stop-snoring/)

If this is the first time you’ve heard of mouth workouts to stop snoring, then why not give it shot? After all, snoring is not something we should all take lightly.

So it’s not just that snoring is annoying for everyone else to hear and can sometimes disrupt our own sleep, it can be really dangerous.

(Via: https://www.thesun.co.uk/fabulous/8842466/simple-workout-stop-snoring/)

Snoring happens because the muscles of the throat relax and collapse while the body is asleep. With the workout exercises, the muscles can get fit again.

Mike says that snoring is often caused by a loss of muscle tone; at night, everything relaxes and collapses. But that collapse can be reduced by exercising the throat.

(Via: https://www.thesun.co.uk/fabulous/8842466/simple-workout-stop-snoring/)

Hence, Mike has come up with some interesting mouth workouts that are supposed to strengthen the muscles in your mouth to prevent snoring,

Mike has come up with a revolutionary tongue and throat workout designed to tone up the bits in your neck that cause snoring.

Sure, it won’t cure those snoring cases caused by things like enlarged nostrils, but he does claim that the workout will help to reduce the volume.

And when the average snore can

Sleep Talk: Episode 42 – What to Eat

Originally at: https://sleephub.com.au/podcast-42/

Episode 42: What to Eat

How does what we eat impact on sleep? What foods or types of diet can help with sleep? To help decipher this complex area we talk to Assoc Prof Marie-Pierre St-Onge, Director Sleep Center of Excellence Columbia University, Irving Medical Center.

Dr Moira Junge (Health Psychologist) and Dr David Cunnington (Sleep Physician) host the monthly podcast, Sleep Talk, talking all things sleep.

Leave a review and subscribe via Apple Podcasts

Audio Timeline / Chapters:

  • 00:00 – 01:41 Introduction
  • 01:41 – 23:04 Theme – What to eat?
  • 23:04 – 25:45 Clinical Tip
  • 25:45 – 29:31 Pick of the Month
  • 29:31 – 30:39 What’s Coming Up?

Next episode: Sleep Research Update

Links mentioned in the podcast: 

Presenters:

Guest interviews:

Marie-Pierre St-Onge

Assoc Prof Marie-Pierre St-Onge is Centre Director of Columbia University Irving Medical Center, Sleep Center of Excellence. A Prof St-Onge has a Ph.D focused in Nutrition from McGill University and is a Fellow of the American Heart Association and Certified in Clinical Sleep Health. In 2007, A Prof St-Onge received NIH funding to study sleep and energy balance and her research now focuses greatly on sleep and its association with obesity and cardiometabolic risk factors. Her research findings show that sleep influences diet and that diet may also influence sleep, allowing her to return to her original passion related to foods and their influence on disease risk.

Regular hosts:

Dr Moira JungeDr Moira Junge is a health psychologist working in the sleep field, who has considerable experience working with people with sleeping difficulties in a multidisciplinary practice using a team-based approach. Moira is actively involved with the Australasian Sleep Association (ASA) and a board member of the Sleep Health Foundation. She has presented numerous workshops for psychologists and is involved with Monash University with teaching and supervision commitments. She is one of the founders and clinic directors at Yarraville Health Group which was established in 1998. In addition to her expertise in sleep disorders, her other areas of interest and expertise include smoking cessation, psychological adjustment to chronic illness, and grief and loss issues.

 

Dr David CunningtonDr David Cunnington is a sleep physician and director of Melbourne Sleep Disorders Centre, and co-founder and contributor to SleepHub. David trained in sleep medicine both in Australia and in the United States, at Harvard Medical School, and …

The Blatant Signs Of Deadly Snoring

Originally at: https://snoringmouthpiecereview.org/snorerx/the-blatant-signs-of-deadly-snoring

A lot of people snore. As a matter of fact, a big percentage of the American population snores.

An estimated 40% of adults in the U.S. snore. And, men, you tend to out-snore women. (Yes, this may explain why you get kicked or shoved at night!)

(Via: https://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2019/04/22/714249236/beyond-annoying-how-to-identify-the-sounds-of-a-troublesome-snore)

Contrary to what other people think that snoring is a sign of deep sleep, it’s not.

And despite the myth that snoring is a sign of deep sleep, there’s really no upside to it.

“Snoring really does not demonstrate anything good, ” says Erich Voigt, an ear, nose, and throat doctor and sleep specialist at New York University Langone Health. “You can have beautifully deep sleep in a silent sleep.”

(Via: https://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2019/04/22/714249236/beyond-annoying-how-to-identify-the-sounds-of-a-troublesome-snore)

Snoring can be a sign of a more serious health condition but that doesn’t mean everybody who snores is in trouble. There are some cases where snoring is harmless. Nonetheless, there are some cases where snoring is an indication of something more serious.

Snoring is never great news, but often it’s harmless (other than the pain your sleeping partner may feel). In some cases, though, it’s a sign of something serious.

(Via: https://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2019/04/22/714249236/beyond-annoying-how-to-identify-the-sounds-of-a-troublesome-snore)

Snoring happens when the airways in the nose and in the mouth become narrow. With the airways obstructed, the tissues in the said areas end up vibrating.  That vibration contributes to the sound of a snore.

When we sleep, if the air that moves through our nose and mouth has a clear passage, we can sleep silently. But when the airways are narrowed, we snore.

“Snoring is basically a vibration of the tissues inside of the airway,” Voigt explains — that is, the roof of the mouth and the vertical folds of tissue that surround the tonsils.

(Via: https://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2019/04/22/714249236/beyond-annoying-how-to-identify-the-sounds-of-a-troublesome-snore)

Alcohol intake is one of the many reasons why people snore. If alcohol intake is limited, it can lessen the snoring. That just shows that snoring can be controlled and treated.

A lot of factors can contribute to snoring, says Voigt. We can control some of the underlying triggers. For instance, drinking alcohol is linked to snoring. Alcohol tends to make the tissues within our mouths swell a bit, and alcohol can also change the quality of sleep.

“Your brain is sedated from alcohol, so the combination can make you snore worse,” Voigt says.

(Via: https://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2019/04/22/714249236/beyond-annoying-how-to-identify-the-sounds-of-a-troublesome-snore)

Weight gain could also contribute to snoring. That means shedding off some pounds could help lessen the snoring.

Being overweight can also increase the likelihood of snoring. So, when people lose weight, this can reduce the amount they snore.

(Via: https://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2019/04/22/714249236/beyond-annoying-how-to-identify-the-sounds-of-a-troublesome-snore)

Lessening …

Healing And Preventing The Damage Caused By The Injuries of Snoring

Originally at: https://snoringmouthpiecereview.org/sleeptight/healing-and-preventing-the-damage-caused-by-the-injuries-of-snoring

Snoring is dangerous. For example, heavy snoring can cause a quick stoppage of breathing that can easily endanger one’s life. Habitual snoring can lead to some serious health and relationship problems. There really is nothing good about the repercussions of snoring.

There is another repercussion of snoring that we hardly hear of. Apparently, snoring causes injuries that can damage the body.

The recurrent vibrations caused by snoring can lead to injuries in the upper airways of people who snore heavily. This in turn, can cause swallowing dysfunction and render individuals more vulnerable for developing the severe condition obstructive sleep apnea.

(Via: https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2019-05/uu-sci043019.php)

Who would have thought that the vibrations caused by snoring can actually be damaging enough to cause some swallowing dysfunction? According to research, it can be.

These findings are reported by researchers at Umeå University, Sweden. Their on-going research focuses on the processes behind vibratory damage and healing of the upper airway tract. The data generated will help identify people at high risk of developing sleep apnea and to find novel treatment strategies.

(Via: https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2019-05/uu-sci043019.php)

Clearly, the health risks of snoring are mounting. Hopefully, this particular research could help heal the damage brought about by snoring.

“Besides the disturbing effects, constant snoring can be a significant health risk. Nonetheless, there are indications that our research will guide towards early preventive measures and in the long term also enhance healing of damaged tissue caused by snoring,” says Associate Professor Per Stål, research leader at the Department of Integrative Medical Biology at Umeå University.

(Via: https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2019-05/uu-sci043019.php)

The findings of the research are not just interesting but alarming as well. According to the findings, patients who snore and suffer from sleep apnea show neuromuscular injuries in their upper respiratory tract. Both snoring and sleep apnea can also damage the nerves and muscles in the soft palate.

Researchers in Umeå have shown that snorers and sleep apnea patients have neuromuscular injuries in the upper respiratory tract. The injuries can be seen at both the structural and molecular level. Researchers could also observe a correlation between snoring and swallowing dysfunction as well as a relation between nerve damage and obstructive sleep apnea. Sleep apnea is characterized by repeated collapse of the upper respiratory tract leading to respiratory arrest during sleep, which increases the risk of cardiovascular disease.

The studies show that people who constantly snore heavily and have sleep apnea displayed a loss of nerves and muscle mass in the soft palate. Furthermore, the attempts by the body to heal damaged tissue were disturbed resulting in an abnormal muscle structure. Another interesting finding was that muscle fibres

How Better Sleep Can Help You Lose Weight [Podcast 66]

Originally at: https://doctorstevenpark.com/loseweight

Summer is in full swing and there’s no better time to get fit and get slim than now. And I know that a lot of our listeners are starting their Keto, Paleo, Whole30 or whatever diets that are really popular right now. And there’s nothing wrong with that. But in this podcast Kathy and I will talk about an issue that not a lot of people think about when they’re going on a diet or they’re starting off trying to lose weight.

And that issue is—are you sleeping well? Are you sleeping long enough? And that’s something that most of us don’t think about. We don’t connect sleep with weight, but that’s a huge, huge problem that one needs to address before you do any sort of diet regimen. 

Note that we now have transcripts available, which you can access by clicking on the link below the video player. 

Download mp3 | Subscribe | Transcript

Show Notes

Glamour article on weight loss

Glamour weight loss experiment

Youtube video on nasal dilators

Toxins podcast

Candlelight disrupts circadian rhythm study. News article

Knee LED study NYT article

How to optimize your bedroom for better sleep. mykoreanamericanhome.com

NOSTRILS post

Prescription medications podcast blogpost

The post How Better Sleep Can Help You Lose Weight [Podcast 66] appeared first on Doctor Steven Y. Park, MD | New York, NY | Integrative Solutions for Obstructive Sleep Apnea, Upper Airway Resistance Syndrome, and Snoring.

from Doctor Steven Y. Park, MD | New York, NY | Integrative Solutions for Obstructive Sleep Apnea, Upper Airway Resistance Syndrome, and SnoringBlog – Doctor Steven Y. Park, MD | New York, NY | Integrative Solutions for Obstructive Sleep Apnea, Upper Airway Resistance Syndrome, and Snoring https://doctorstevenpark.com/loseweight…