Light and Deep Sleep: How Much Do You Need For Each Of Them?

Originally at: https://snoringmouthpiecereview.org/good-morning-snore-solution/light-and-deep-sleep-how-much-do-you-need-for-each-of-them

It is recommended for adults to have 7-9 hours of sleep every day. If you think that’s a lot of time and that you could have done something productive at that time, then it depends on what you mean by productive because resting the body for 7-9 hours is fruitful itself.

 

The body goes through a lot while you sleep so you can be more productive when you wake up. It goes through stages of sleep. Along with knowing that you need 7-9 hours of sleep a day, it is also important to know how much you need per stage of it.

There are five stages of sleep that rotate between non-rapid eye movement (NREM) and rapid eye movement (REM) and include drowsiness, light sleep, moderate to deep sleep, deepest sleep, and dreaming.

Experts have recommended that adults gets about 7 to 9 hours of sleep per night. New research aims to identify not just how much total sleep you need — but also how much of each stage of sleep you need.

Sleep stages 1, 2, and REM consist of light sleep, while 3 and 4 comprise deep sleep.

(Via:https://www.healthline.com/health/how-much-deep-sleep-do-you-need)

 

Healthy individuals need about a quarter of the total number of sleeping hours to be in deep sleep.

In healthy adults, about 13 to 23 percent of your sleep is deep sleep. So if you sleep for 8 hours a night, that’s roughly 62 to 110 minutes.

However, as you get older you require less deep sleep.

During deep sleep, a variety of functions take place in the mind and body:

  • memories are consolidated
  • learning and emotions process
  • physical recovery occurs
  • blood sugar levels and metabolism balance out
  • the immune system is energized
  • the brain detoxifies

(Via:https://www.healthline.com/health/how-much-deep-sleep-do-you-need)

 

The same goes for REM sleep. The REM cycle starts at 1 ½ hours after you’ve fallen asleep and repeats at the same time interval.

For most adults, REM takes up about 20 to 25 percent of sleep, and this seems to be healthy during average sleep cycles. However, sleep research is raising some interesting questions. One recent study suggested that higher amounts of REM sleep may be associated with depression. But don’t go making sudden changes in your sleep habits — it is not clear which is the cause and which is the effect.

(Via:https://www.healthline.com/health/how-much-deep-sleep-do-you-need)

 

For light sleep, the stage when you are in transition to a more stable sleep, there is no minimum. But you have to remember that too much of it has consequences.

Although sleep scientists believe that light sleep is good for you, there

Myths & Facts About Your Sleep Position [Podcast 77]

Originally at: https://doctorstevenpark.com/sleepposition?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=sleepposition sleep positions

In this episode, Kathy and I will discuss a very intimate topic: your sleep position. Over the years, I’ve seen a wide variety of explanations for why certain people like to sleep in certain positions, and even personality type differences. In this podcast, you will discover:

  • Which sleep position is most healthy for you
  • The one bad advice dermatologists are telling women
  • How to avoid aging and facial wrinkles
  • Why hospitals can be dangerous for you or your loved one
  • And much more.

Download mp3  |  Subscribe


Show Notes 

Sleep Interrupted: A physician reveals the #1 reason why so many of us are sick and tired 

JAMA article on pregnant women and sleep position and babies born small for gestational age

Positional sleep apnea article

Sleep Position book

Drug induced sleep endoscopy results in AHI < 5 

CPAP increases fetal movement in women with pre-eclampsia 

UARS article in Bottom Line Health

SlumberBump sleep positioner

Antisnoreshirt

Somnibel sleep positioner

Night Shift sleep positioner

Contour pillow for snoring 

 

The post Myths & Facts About Your Sleep Position [Podcast 77] appeared first on Doctor Steven Y. Park, MD | New York, NY | Integrative Solutions for Obstructive Sleep Apnea, Upper Airway Resistance Syndrome, and Snoring.

from Doctor Steven Y. Park, MD | New York, NY | Integrative Solutions for Obstructive Sleep Apnea, Upper Airway Resistance Syndrome, and SnoringBlog – Doctor Steven Y. Park, MD | New York, NY | Integrative Solutions for Obstructive Sleep Apnea, Upper Airway Resistance Syndrome, and Snoring https://doctorstevenpark.com/sleepposition?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=sleepposition…

What’s Causing You To Snore?

Originally at: https://snoringmouthpiecereview.org/sleeptight/whats-causing-you-to-snore

You won’t always know that you snore. In fact, you don’t actually realize that you are snoring. It’s your partner that knows and complains especially if it gets loud. It can be really loud.

 

Snoring affects millions of people. But why do people snore? What is it really? Well, have you noticed an animation about someone singing loudly that their tiny tissue hanging on their throat is showing? Yes, that one. Sound is produced when air vibrates within the soft palates and that tissue. This happens when your airways get narrow.

When you hear someone snoring, it means air is not flowing freely through the back of the throat. The sound occurs when air causes vibration of the soft palate and the uvula, the tiny pink flap of tissue that hangs down at the rear of your throat.

(Via:http://www.columbianeurology.org/neurology/staywell/document.php?id=136)

 

Besides being an inconvenience to other people, snoring can mean something else to you. Snoring is not a disease or an illness. But it can be a symptom or a cause of a medical condition.

Asides from being a nuisance to your friends or your partner, snoring also affects how you sleep. It reduces the quality of your sleep, could result in sleep apnea or lead to chronic sleep deprivation. Ever woken up in the morning tired, cranky and not quite feeling like you got a good night time’s rest? Snoring might be the cause.

(Via:https://www.sleepcycle.com/snoring/10-natural-snoring-remedies/)

 

We need to know the factors other than medical ones that could affect snoring so we can properly address it on our own. The first and common one is weight. If you weigh more than you should at your age, height, or physical activities, then chances are that you’ll snore. If biology were to be a basis, then men are less fortunate than women.

A couple of factors come into play here. One popular one is weight. Carrying excess weight around your neck and throat can cause snoring. Then there is good old biology. In general, men have narrower air passages than women and are most likely to snore.

(Via:https://www.sleepcycle.com/snoring/10-natural-snoring-remedies/)

 

Not having head elevation while sleeping is also a factor.

Sleeping flat on your back could also make you more susceptible to snoring. Even the shape of your mouth or a stuffy nose from a cold could make you sound like an old engine revving up.

(Via:https://www.sleepcycle.com/snoring/10-natural-snoring-remedies/)

 

The current condition of your nasal passages is another one.

Another very popular one is the structure of your entire nasal cavity. Deviated septums, nasal polyps and enlarged tonsils could be the

Celebrating 10 years of the REM Runner Blog!

Originally at: http://julieflygare.com/celebrating-10-years-of-the-rem-runner-blog/

10 years ago today, I came out as a person with narcolepsy. On November 10, 2009, I started this REM Runner blog, disclosing on the internet for the first time that: “I’m Julie Flygare, a person living with narcolepsy with cataplexy.” 

From my original About Me: 

“Narcolepsy has changed my life for better and worse. I am proud to be a person with narcolepsy, yet I hope to build a brighter future for this serious chronic illness… On this blog, I will share some of my experiences as a person with narcolepsy, and as a runner, yogi, and photographer. In doing so, I hope to shed some light on narcolepsy, a little known and often misunderstood condition.”

Feels like yesterday? Nope.

I wish I could say “it feels like yesterday,” but honestly, it feels like a lifetime ago. My drive and mission remains the same, but this past decade has been a tremendous period of growth for me, the lowest of lows and highest of highs. Some of the lows I’ve shared here, like losing my dad and the nutty rollercoaster of publishing my book, others I’ve kept private.

At the same time, I ran three marathons, published Wide Awake and Dreaming: A Memoir of Narcolepsy, created the Narcolepsy: Not Alone campaign, founded Project Sleep, moved across the country, co-founded the Jack & Julie Narcolepsy Scholarship, worked full-time in the cancer non-profit space, fell in-love with speaking, and eventually took on my dream job of running Project Sleep

My blog is OLDER than Instagram.

When I started this blog, it was an important platform for me to share candid stories about living with type 1 narcolepsy with cataplexy. At the time, blogs were fairly new and Instagram didn’t even exist (IG launched the following year, on Oct. 6, 2010).

Today, I don’t publish here as much as I’d like. I have dozens of half-written posts and ideas listed in notebooks. When I prioritize my time so carefully, blogging often gets cut. At some point, I started to over-think each post. Meanwhile, Instagram snuck into my life, and became the place where I quickly published candid stories and thoughts and seemingly reached my community easily that way. 

What hasn’t changed… Your Love and Support!

Preparing for this post, I searched old emails and was reminded that I didn’t come up with title “REM Runner.” I’d emailed a few close friends these ideas: “The Dream Run” and “The Dream Jogger.” My best friend, Julie Glazer Scher responded, suggesting “REM Runner.”

To this day, Julie has been a passionate and dedicated supporter. From titling this …

How To Address Snoring Naturally

Originally at: https://snoringmouthpiecereview.org/snorerx/how-to-address-snoring-naturally

You will snore at some point in your life. That is a fact. Will it imply that something is wrong? Yes, it can. Can something be done to address it? Yes to that as well.

 

Snoring happens when your air has a hard time getting through your air passages. The air vibrates within the walls of the throat and produces a sound that we know as a snore. Snoring is more common in middle to older aged people. The loud kind of snore, that is. Snoring can be both a symptom of a condition or a cause to it. This is why knowing your health condition, medical condition, sleeping practices, and the way you snore can help determine how to address your snoring problems.

 

If your snoring isn’t caused by a medical condition, then you can opt for a treatment that won’t necessarily require medical attention. But if you are in doubt, it’s best to consult your physician. Here are some natural measures you can do about your snoring.

 

Drop the excess weight.

People who are overweight are two times more likely to snore than those who aren’t. The reason is simple, overweight people carry extra fat around their necks which narrows their airways and causes them to snore. So lose a couple of pounds and lose your noisy nighttime companion. Switching up your diet, getting some exercise and ironically enough sleep will help you lose weight.

(Via:https://www.sleepcycle.com/snoring/10-natural-snoring-remedies/)

 

Switch to other sleeping positions.

Sleeping on your back can cause your airways to become blocked or narrowed. If you notice that you snore while sleeping on your back it is time to switch up your sleeping position. Sleeping on your side is usually recommended. Old habits die hard so the odds are that as you drift deeper into sleep you’d roll unto your back again. The fix? Invest in a body pillow. A body pillow will help you maintain sleeping on your side. Another mean old trick is sewing tennis balls unto the back of your pajamas.

(Via:https://www.sleepcycle.com/snoring/10-natural-snoring-remedies/)

 

Reduce alcohol consumption and cigarette smoking.

If you drink alcohol habitually, especially before bed that might be the cause of your snoring. Drinking alcohol a couple of hours before you go to bed relaxes your throat muscles, causing you to snore. Regular smokers are also likely to snore. Smoking irritates your throat tissues leading to inflammation, that results in snores.

(Via:https://www.sleepcycle.com/snoring/10-natural-snoring-remedies/)

 

Increase water intake.

Staying hydrated is always a good idea, particularly for snorers. Dehydration leads to mucus forming in your nose which could make you snore. Drinking

Help Me To Choose A Cover For My New Book

Originally at: https://doctorstevenpark.com/help-me-to-choose-a-cover-for-my-new-book?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=help-me-to-choose-a-cover-for-my-new-book The 90 Day Sleep Diet: Think Straight, Lose Weight, Feel Great.

Many of you may know by now that I’m working furiously on a new book: The 90 Day Sleep Diet: Think Straight, Lose Weight, Feel Great.

I have a contest on 99Designs for a book cover design, and have narrowed it down to two designers and three covers.

Will you please give me your opinion on which cover you prefer and why? I truly value your opinion on this matter.

I’m  still in the early stages of production and shooting for publication in early 2020.

Please click here to vote.

 

 

 

 

The post Help Me To Choose A Cover For My New Book appeared first on Doctor Steven Y. Park, MD | New York, NY | Integrative Solutions for Obstructive Sleep Apnea, Upper Airway Resistance Syndrome, and Snoring.

from Doctor Steven Y. Park, MD | New York, NY | Integrative Solutions for Obstructive Sleep Apnea, Upper Airway Resistance Syndrome, and SnoringBlog – Doctor Steven Y. Park, MD | New York, NY | Integrative Solutions for Obstructive Sleep Apnea, Upper Airway Resistance Syndrome, and Snoring https://doctorstevenpark.com/help-me-to-choose-a-cover-for-my-new-book?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=help-me-to-choose-a-cover-for-my-new-book…

Listen Now: Social Experience of Narcolepsy on Sleep Junkies Podcast

Originally at: http://julieflygare.com/listen-now-social-experience-of-narcolepsy-on-sleep-junkies-podcast/

“I remember keeping [my narcolepsy] private and always feeling like it was this thing sitting at the back of my throat that I wanted to share, but just stopping myself, remembering ‘you’ll get a bad reaction, this person won’t understand.’”   – Julie Flygare, Sleep Junkies podcast

 “So you went from something being a secret to the outside world, and then you kind of switched on the turbo, started a blog, wrote your book, and then to Project Sleep… From one extreme to the other and there seems to be no stopping what you’re doing.”    – Jeff Mann, Sleep Junkies

I was honored to be interviewed recently for the Sleep Junkies podcast – listen here! Please share this with friends to inform your community on what it’s REALLY like to live with narcolepsy. The psychosocial impact, stigma and undue jokes are a huge part of living with narcolepsy, yet under-discussed.

033: Narcolepsy: the social experience – Julie Flygare

Thank you, Sleep Junkies and Jeff Mann for inviting me to share my experience and Project Sleep’s efforts to build a brighter future. I’ve enjoyed getting to know Jeff over the past year, he published this neat article about my efforts last year. 

from Blog – Julie Flygare http://julieflygare.com/listen-now-social-experience-of-narcolepsy-on-sleep-junkies-podcast/…

Most Prevalent Sleep Disturbances

Originally at: https://snoringmouthpiecereview.org/zquiet/most-prevalent-sleep-disturbances

All of us need good quality and quantity of sleep. But unfortunately, not every one of us can get it. Society today compels us to work harder than we did yesterday. More time is spent on working than resting.  Sleep can sometimes be a luxury for some. But the truth of the matter is that we need as much sleep as we can get. Getting the enough number of hours of sleep is crucial and it should be of good quality. As in, you are having a deep sleep and not spending more time tossing and turning or waking up in the middle of the night.

 

Some people can easily fall asleep. Some others find it a chore. Some have a sound sleep while others don’t. Sleeping isn’t the same for everyone no matter how much we need it or get it. Sleeping can be inconvenient for others especially for those who have medical conditions. Here are some of the most common sleep disturbances.

 

Snoring. Snoring happens when your air passages get narrow.

About half of all people in the world snore at some point in their lives. More common in men, over 40 percent of adult men and 24 percent of adult women are habitual snorers. In more detail, snoring is the sound that comes from obstructed air movement in your throat when you breathe while sleeping. 

(Via:https://www.sleepcycle.com/sleep-disorders/the-most-common-sleep-disorders/)

 

Sleep apnea. Sleep apnea is also known as a stop in breathing while sleeping.

Sleep apnea is a potentially serious sleep disorder. People who go untreated stop breathing repeatedly during sleep. This can lead to the brain and the rest of the body not getting enough oxygen. Which in turn can lead to stroke, heart failure, diabetes, depression, and headaches.

(Via:https://www.sleepcycle.com/sleep-disorders/the-most-common-sleep-disorders/)

 

Insomnia. Sounds familiar? Like snoring, one probably has or will encounter this in their life.

Ever had trouble falling asleep? Or do you find yourself waking up in the middle of the night, unable to fall back to sleep? Is this something you experience more than three days a week? If so, you might be suffering from insomnia. Insomnia refers to habitual sleeplessness and is the most common sleep disorder in the world.

(Via:https://www.sleepcycle.com/sleep-disorders/the-most-common-sleep-disorders/)

 

Narcolepsy. This is a medical condition that involves extreme sleepiness during the day.

Also referred to as Excessive uncontrollable daytime sleepiness, narcolepsy causes overwhelming daytime sleepiness. It is a chronic sleep disorder affecting 1 in 2,000 to 3,000 people. The cause of narcolepsy is related to the loss of cells in the brain that secrete hypocretin. Hypocretin is a chemical in the

Get Yourself A Better Sleep By Following These Tips

Originally at: https://snoringmouthpiecereview.org/good-morning-snore-solution/get-yourself-a-better-sleep-by-following-these-tips

Life is busy. Could it get any busier? Yes. But can you have enough sleep every day? Yes as well.  Today’s active and bustling society may not rest, but you can. In fact, getting enough and good quality sleep has to be given more emphasis these days since getting busy is starting to be a norm.

 

Sleep is just as important as good nutrition and exercise. One can never truly call himself or herself healthy without any one of these three. Sleeping can actually lead to a healthy life. If you are having a hard time falling asleep or getting a good sleep, these tips will help you out.

 

Shut off the noise.

You may not recall the racket caused by yesterday’s midnight garbage pickup, but your body probably does. Even if you don’t wake up, noise can disrupt your slumber and cause restlessness, increased heart rate and blood pressure, and changes in breathing patterns…

(Via: https://www.health.com/sleep/advice-for-better-sleep?slide=525773#525773)

 

Have some aromatherapy.

Creating a bedtime ritual that includes diffusing (a process of dispersing) essential oils 30 minutes before sacking out is a simple and effective way to cue the body to rest, says Sara Panton, essential-oil expert and cofounder of Vitruvi. Not only are there certain scents that encourage drowsiness, but the very act of setting up a routine helps signal to your brain that it’s time to start shutting off.

(Via: https://www.health.com/sleep/advice-for-better-sleep?slide=525767#525767)

 

Be cool. Literally.

Body temperature regularly fluctuates throughout the day—it’s usually at its highest in the afternoon and lowest in the early a.m. So if your room is hot, your body will work all night to cool down—and if you’re sweating, you’re more likely to wake up. The sweet spot: 65 degrees, according to the National Sleep Foundation.

(Via: https://www.health.com/sleep/advice-for-better-sleep?slide=525770#525770)

 

Give your space a room to breathe. Exercise caution though. You might not want to open your windows for too long especially if there are insects and creepy crawlies that want to join you inside.

Room stuffiness can hike nasal congestion and hinder your ability to breathe while you doze. Per a study in the journal Indoor Air, people who kept their window open overnight felt more alert the next morning than they did when it had been kept closed. If you live in a city and opening your window exposes you to noise, crack it open for 15 minutes during the day instead. No windows? No problem. Invest in a plant like a peace lily, which naturally purifies air.

(Via: https://www.health.com/sleep/advice-for-better-sleep?slide=525782#525782)

 

Make the room darker earlier.

Not only does light send “stay awake” alerts to