7 Myths About Tonsillectomy [Podcast 76]

Originally at: https://doctorstevenpark.com/tonsils?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=tonsils tonsils

In this episode, Kathy and I have a revealing discussion about the 7 most common myths that I encounter about surgery for the tonsils:

  1. Don’t take out tonsils because they are part of the immune system and help fight infections 
  2. Tonsils can grow back after tonsillectomy 
  3. Tonsils shrink as you get older or you can outgrow them
  4. Surgery can lead to bleeding
  5. Anesthesia can be harmful in children
  6. You need to find the best surgeon 
  7. Small tonsils don’t need to be removed.

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Show Notes 

George Catlin: Shut Your Mouth and Save Your Life

Sleep apnea lowers your immune system response study

Tonsillectomy does not alter your immune system response study

Rate of tonsil regrowth after tonsillectomy 

Rates of bleeding after tonsillectomy

CHAT study

Patterns of Upper Airway Obstruction on Drug-Induced Sleep Endoscopy in Patients with Sleep-Disordered Breathing with AHI<5 

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from Doctor Steven Y. Park, MD | New York, NY | Integrative Solutions for Obstructive Sleep Apnea, Upper Airway Resistance Syndrome, and SnoringBlog – Doctor Steven Y. Park, MD | New York, NY | Integrative Solutions for Obstructive Sleep Apnea, Upper Airway Resistance Syndrome, and Snoring https://doctorstevenpark.com/tonsils?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=tonsils…

Reasons Why Being A Night Person Is Not Good For Your Health

Originally at: https://snoringmouthpiecereview.org/snorerx/reasons-why-being-a-night-person-is-not-good-for-your-health

Many things can keep us up at night. It can be work that you took home as an assignment because your boss insists on having it done by morning. It can also be insomnia or a medical condition like anxiety. It can also be that you are doing a movie marathon on Netflix. Or maybe, you just like to be up at night and not during daylight. Whichever it is, it’s nowhere near good. This is so because studies have shown that the relationship with improper sleep-wake cycle and health issues are direct.

 

You’ll be at risk for higher blood pressure. You don’t have it in the family. You eat healthy meals. Therefore don’t let being a night owl break the chain.

In a 2013 study in the journal Chronobiology International, researchers found that “evening types” were  than “morning types” to have , even after they controlled for participants’ total amount of sleep and sleep quality.

(Via:https://www.health.com/sleep/health-risks-night-owl?slide=513065#513065)

 

You’ll have less time for exercise. Sleep is important. So is exercise. Don’t lose both.

Self-described night owls  than people who consider themselves early birds, according to a 2014 research abstract in the journal Sleep; they also report having more difficulty finding time to exercise and maintaining a regular exercise schedule.

(Via: https://www.health.com/sleep/health-risks-night-owl?slide=513071#513071)

 

You’re more likely to gain weight. Unless you want that, then this probably won’t be a problem.

Some experts believe that  disrupts the body’s natural overnight fasting period, which can interfere with its ability to burn fat. Night owls also happen to  per day than early birds, according to a 2011 study in the journal Obesity–248 more, on average–perhaps because willpower is lower when you’re tired and we  late at night.

(Via:https://www.health.com/sleep/health-risks-night-owl?slide=513077#513077)

 

You’re more at risk for diabetes type 2.

In one 2015 study, published in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism, men with evening chronotypes were more likely to have  (a condition in which the body loses muscle mass), compared to men with morning chronotypes.

Female night owls, compared with their early bird counterparts, tended to have more belly fat and a greater risk of metabolic syndrome—a cluster of conditions (like high blood pressure, , and high cholesterol) that increase a person’s risk for heart disease and diabetes.

(Via:https://www.health.com/sleep/health-risks-night-owl?slide=513086#513086)

 

Night sleep can also make it harder to manage.

For those who do go on to develop diabetes, being a night owl can make the condition more difficult to manage. A 2013 study in Diabetes Care found that, for people with type 2 diabetes, having a later bedtime is associated with —even after researchers

This “Silent” Sleep Problem Stumps Even Some Doctors

Originally at: https://doctorstevenpark.com/this-silent-sleep-problem-stumps-even-some-doctors?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=this-silent-sleep-problem-stumps-even-some-doctors

Article on Bottom Line Health

Doctor is stumped

Are doctors stumped by your health problems? Do you suffer from severe chronic fatigue, poor sleep, headaches, anxiety, chronic pain, cold hands, headaches, digestive problems, hormonal imbalances, or all of the above? Are all your tests coming back normal, including your sleep study?

Click here to read my my eye-opening article about Upper Airway Resistance Syndrome (UARS) on Bottom Line Health.

If you suffer from any of the symptoms listed above, please let me know in the comments area below.

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from Doctor Steven Y. Park, MD | New York, NY | Integrative Solutions for Obstructive Sleep Apnea, Upper Airway Resistance Syndrome, and SnoringBlog – Doctor Steven Y. Park, MD | New York, NY | Integrative Solutions for Obstructive Sleep Apnea, Upper Airway Resistance Syndrome, and Snoring https://doctorstevenpark.com/this-silent-sleep-problem-stumps-even-some-doctors?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=this-silent-sleep-problem-stumps-even-some-doctors…

When An Allergy Is Not Just An Allergy [Podcast 75]

Originally at: https://doctorstevenpark.com/when-an-allergy-is-not-just-an-allergy-podcast-75?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=when-an-allergy-is-not-just-an-allergy-podcast-75

In this episode, Kathy and I will be revealing the steps we took to significantly improve our family’s allergy symptoms this fall.

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Shownotes

The Truth About Allergies Revealed blogpost

Sleep Interrupted: A physician reveals the #1 reason why so many of us are sick and tired 

Allergy-free bedsheets

Micro-poop theory blogpost

Dyson HEPA vacuum cleaner

The Sinus, Allergy and Migraine Study (SAMS)

Dr. David Buccholz: Heal Your Headache

Long term nasal saline irrigation and increased infections blogpost

The post When An Allergy Is Not Just An Allergy [Podcast 75] appeared first on Doctor Steven Y. Park, MD | New York, NY | Integrative Solutions for Obstructive Sleep Apnea, Upper Airway Resistance Syndrome, and Snoring.

from Doctor Steven Y. Park, MD | New York, NY | Integrative Solutions for Obstructive Sleep Apnea, Upper Airway Resistance Syndrome, and SnoringBlog – Doctor Steven Y. Park, MD | New York, NY | Integrative Solutions for Obstructive Sleep Apnea, Upper Airway Resistance Syndrome, and Snoring https://doctorstevenpark.com/when-an-allergy-is-not-just-an-allergy-podcast-75?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=when-an-allergy-is-not-just-an-allergy-podcast-75…

Sleep Talk: Episode 47 – Tracking Sleep

Originally at: https://sleephub.com.au/podcast-47/

Episode 47: Tracking Sleep

Tracking sleep over time can give helpful insights into sleep patterns and ways of improving sleep. This month we discuss the latest technologies for tracking sleep and interesting ways these technologies are being used in research with our guest James Slater from University of Western Australia.

Dr Moira Junge (Health Psychologist) and Dr David Cunnington (Sleep Physician) host the monthly podcast, Sleep Talk – Talking all things sleep.

Leave a review and subscribe via Apple Podcasts

Audio Timeline / Chapters:

  • 00:00 – 01:07 Introduction
  • 01:07 – 20:33 Theme – Tracking Sleep
  • 20:33 – 21:32 Clinical Tip
  • 21:32 – 24:15 Pick of the Month
  • 24:15 – 25:26 What’s Coming Up?

Next episode: Social time and daylight saving time

Links mentioned in the podcast: 

Presenters:

Guest interviews:

James Slater is undertaking his PhD at the Centre for Sleep Science at University of Western Australia, and is a sleep scientist at Royal Children’s Hospital, Melbourne. James is sought out for his expertise on sleep assessment, a topic on which James has published journal articles, a textbook chapter, technical papers and given invited talks.

 

 

Regular hosts:

Dr Moira JungeDr Moira Junge is a health psychologist working in the sleep field, who has considerable experience working with people with sleeping difficulties in a multidisciplinary practice using a team-based approach. Moira is actively involved with the Australasian Sleep Association (ASA) and a board member of the Sleep Health Foundation. She has presented numerous workshops for psychologists and is involved with Monash University with teaching and supervision commitments. She is one of the founders and clinic directors at Yarraville Health Group which was established in 1998. In addition to her expertise in sleep disorders, her other areas of interest and expertise include smoking cessation, psychological adjustment to chronic illness, and grief and loss issues.

 

Dr David CunningtonDr David Cunnington is a sleep physician and director of Melbourne Sleep Disorders Centre, and co-founder and contributor to SleepHub. David trained in sleep medicine both in Australia and in the United States, at Harvard Medical School, and is certified as both an International Sleep Medicine Specialist and International Behavioural Sleep Medicine Specialist. David’s clinical practice covers all areas of sleep medicine and he is actively involved in training health …

Science Approved Ways To Fall Asleep Easier

Originally at: https://snoringmouthpiecereview.org/good-morning-snore-solution/science-approved-ways-to-fall-asleep-easier

Sleep is a crucial form of rest for the whole body. Everyone needs it. But sometimes, not everyone gets it. Other than staying up for long purposely because of work or other activities, one can’t go to sleep simply because he or she has insomnia. Insomnia can be caused by a number of factors. The most commons ones are medications or medical conditions that disturb the sleep cycle. But if you’re not under any of these, then what’s been keeping you up may be anxiety.

Unless certain medical conditions or medications are the cause of your sleeplessness, the most common culprit is anxiety, says Lisa Meltzer, an education scholar for the National Sleep Foundation and associate professor of pediatrics at National Jewish Health in Denver.

(Via:https://www.huffpost.com/entry/15-ways-to-fall-asleep-faster_n_55dde3e7e4b04ae497054470)

 

Anxiety makes you too aware of your surroundings. Which makes sense. The unease, worry or fear can sometimes keep you up more than caffeine ever could. If you are having a hard time relaxing, these evidence-based ways to fall asleep easier can help you.

 

Compel yourself to stay awake.

Is there anything reverse psychology isn’t good for? In this case, it may alleviate excessive sleep anxiety. A small study conducted at the University of Glasgow found that sleep-onset insomniacs who were instructed to lay in bed and try to stay awake with their eyes open fell asleep quicker than participants told to fall asleep without this “paradoxical intention” (PI). Participants in the PI group fell asleep easier and showed less sleep performance anxiety.

(Via:https://www.huffpost.com/entry/15-ways-to-fall-asleep-faster_n_55dde3e7e4b04ae497054470)

 

Get your hands and brain working by doing something for 10 minutes.

“This is a stimulus control theory,” says Meltzer. “Everything in life has a stimulus value, even your bed,” meaning your body should recognize that lying in bed means it’s time to go to sleep. To give your bed that value, the only things you should be doing in it are sleep and sex, she explains. “Getting out of bed if you can’t sleep is the hardest one to do, but it’s so important. If you’re spending 10 hours in bed, but only sleeping six, that’s really bad. Your bed becomes a place for thinking, worrying, watching TV, and not for sleeping.”

(Via:https://www.huffpost.com/entry/15-ways-to-fall-asleep-faster_n_55dde3e7e4b04ae497054470)

 

Keep your clock away. But why?

You toss and turn, trying to fall asleep, watching the minutes tick toward morning on your bedside clock. Does this scenario sound familiar? Do yourself a favor: Hide the clock. Constantly checking the time only increases your stress, making it harder to turn down the dial on your nervous system and fall asleep. “If you stare at

Fluoride: Friend or Foe? [Podcast 74]

Originally at: https://doctorstevenpark.com/fluoride?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=fluoride Toothpaste with fluoride

In this episode, Kathy and I will be talking about a controversial issue, which is the topic of fluoride in our water supply, food, and even our medications. For a more detailed article about the potential dangers of fluoride, click here. During this discussion, we will reveal:

  • How and why fluoride was added to our water supply
  • How I began to suspect the dangers of fluoride
  • Multiple studies linking higher levels of fluoride with lower IQ levels
  • How fluoride may help to shrink our jaws (but have less cavities)
  • How to minimize your daily exposure to fluoride.

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Show Notes

OTC and prescription sleep aids

Original fluoride article

The Story of Fluoridation

Fluoride in otosclerosis article

Rat palatal shelf growth and fluoride

Braces in pregnant rats given fluoride

Fluoride and rat tooth movement

Developmental Fluoride Neurotoxicity: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

Prenatal Fluoride Exposure and Cognitive Outcomes in Children at 4 and 6–12 Years of Age in Mexico

Association Between Maternal Fluoride Exposure During Pregnancy and IQ Scores in Offspring in Canada

Decreased melatonin biosynthesis, calcium flux, pineal gland calcification and aging: a hypothetical framework

Fluoride and low thyroid levels

Fluoride deposition in the aged human pineal gland

The Hidden Cause of Acne: How Toxic Water Is Affecting Your Health and What You Can Do about It

Complete List of Fluoride-Free Bottled Water

Fluoride Free Toothpaste

How to detox from toxic fluoride

Medications with fluoride

Reverse osmosis water filter

 

 

 

The post Fluoride: Friend or Foe? [Podcast 74] appeared first on Doctor Steven Y. Park, MD | New York, NY | Integrative Solutions for Obstructive Sleep Apnea, Upper Airway Resistance Syndrome, and Snoring.

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Sleep Talk: Episode 46 – Sleep Hygiene

Originally at: https://sleephub.com.au/podcast-46/

Episode 46: Sleep Hygiene

What is sleep hygiene? Does it work? Can we be too careful about sleep? We discuss the pros and cons of sleep hygiene and put its role in perspective.

Dr Moira Junge (Health Psychologist) and Dr David Cunnington (Sleep Physician) host the monthly podcast, Sleep Talk – Talking all things sleep.

Leave a review and subscribe via Apple Podcasts

Audio Timeline / Chapters:

  • 00:00 – 02:00 Introduction
  • 02:00 – 23:58 Theme – Sleep Hygiene
  • 23:58 – 25:00 Clinical Tip
  • 25:00 – 27:54 Pick of the Month
  • 27:54 – 29:23 What’s Coming Up?

Next episode: Tracking Sleep

Links mentioned in the podcast: 

Presenters:

Dr Moira JungeDr Moira Junge is a health psychologist working in the sleep field, who has considerable experience working with people with sleeping difficulties in a multidisciplinary practice using a team-based approach. Moira is actively involved with the Australasian Sleep Association (ASA) and a board member of the Sleep Health Foundation. She has presented numerous workshops for psychologists and is involved with Monash University with teaching and supervision commitments. She is one of the founders and clinic directors at Yarraville Health Group which was established in 1998. In addition to her expertise in sleep disorders, her other areas of interest and expertise include smoking cessation, psychological adjustment to chronic illness, and grief and loss issues.

 

Dr David CunningtonDr David Cunnington is a sleep physician and director of Melbourne Sleep Disorders Centre, and co-founder and contributor to SleepHub. David trained in sleep medicine both in Australia and in the United States, at Harvard Medical School, and is certified as both an International Sleep Medicine Specialist and International Behavioural Sleep Medicine Specialist. David’s clinical practice covers all areas of sleep medicine and he is actively involved in training health professionals in sleep. David is a regular media commentator on sleep, both in traditional media and social media. David’s recent research has been in the area of non-drug, psychologically-based treatments such as cognitive behavioral therapy and mindfulness in managing insomnia, restless legs syndrome and other sleep disorders.

Connect with David on Twitter or Facebook.…

Which is Better for Insomnia? CPAP vs. ASV: Interview With Dr. Barry Krakow [Podcast 73]

Originally at: https://doctorstevenpark.com/krakowinsomnia?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=krakowinsomnia Why You Keep Waking Up At Night

If you have been told that you don’t have obstructive sleep apnea but still can’t get a good night’s sleep, then this discussion is for you.

In this special episode, I will be having a conversation with with Dr. Barry Krakow, who will talk about his new landmark study on eclinicalmedicine, the online version of the prestigious journal Lancet. The title of the paper is Prospective Randomized Controlled Trial on the Efficacy of Continuous Positive Airway Pressure and Adaptive Servo-Ventilation in the Treatment of Chronic Complex Insomnia. 

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Show Notes

Sound Sleep, Sound Mind: 7 Keys to Sleeping through the Night.

UARS Podcast Interview with Dr. Guilleminault

TEDxABQ talk: Why Do You Wake Up At Night?

Complex insomnia: insomnia and sleep-disordered breathing in a consecutive series of crime victims with nightmares and PTSD

Prospective Randomized Controlled Trial on the Efficacy of Continuous Positive Airway Pressure and Adaptive Servo-Ventilation in the Treatment of Chronic Complex Insomnia

Prevalence of Sleep Disorders Among Soldiers With Combat-Related Posttraumatic Stress Disorder

Itamar WatchPAT Home Study Meta-analysis

The post Which is Better for Insomnia? CPAP vs. ASV: Interview With Dr. Barry Krakow [Podcast 73] appeared first on Doctor Steven Y. Park, MD | New York, NY | Integrative Solutions for Obstructive Sleep Apnea, Upper Airway Resistance Syndrome, and Snoring.

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How do I adjust for the start of daylight saving time?

Originally at: https://sleephub.com.au/start-daylight-saving-time/

Worried about adjusting for the start of daylight saving time?

daylight savingsOn Sunday 6th October, in the early hours of the morning, daylight saving time begins in Australia (unless you live in QLD, WA or NT). At 2am, clocks shift forward an hour to 3am. If you are a good sleeper, you’re probably not reading this anyway, as you will generally be able to go to bed at your usual time (according to the clock), and get to sleep without a problem. However, if you have trouble sleeping, it’s important to have a plan to minimise the impact of this change on your sleep.

What problems might I run in to?

With the clock shifting forward an hour, the most common problems people run in to are:

  1. Not feeling tired at their normal bed time
  2. Trouble getting up in the morning
  3. Being anxious about what will happen with sleep

Shifting the clock forward 1 hour, is the same as shifting your entire schedule 1 hour earlier, or travelling 1 time zone to the east.

Going to bed

With the new time being 1 hour later, it’s likely that you won’t feel sleepy or fall asleep readily if you go to bed at the new time.  As such, don’t just go to bed at the same clock time out of habit, instead on Sunday night, aim to stay up an hour later. This has 2 effects:

  1. Helping you build up a little more sleep debt, making it easier to get to sleep and stay asleep
  2. Delaying your body clock, so that your internal clock also shifts 1 hour later

daylight savings timeOver the next few days, as you begin to feel sleepy earlier, you can shift the time you go to bed earlier. This could be in half hour steps, or if you are more cautious go to bed 15 minutes earlier each day, and in 4 days you will have adjusted to the new time.

Most people can shift their body clock up to 2 hours later each 24 hours without much effort. We see this when we travel across time zones. Going from Melbourne to Perth, a 2 hour later shift, generally takes a only a day or two to adjust to. Interestingly people find travelling to the east or shifting their clocks earlier harder, and can generally only shift 1 hour earlier each 24 hours. So travelling from Perth back to Melbourne takes longer to adjust.

Getting up in the morning

It’s likely that you’ll want to wake later than your usual waking time, as with the time change, this will be an hour later. However, over a …