Keeping Bedtime As Quiet As Possible

Originally at: https://snoringmouthpiecereview.org/zquiet/keeping-bedtime-as-quiet-as-possible

Relax. Close your eyes. Leave your worries behind and slumber into the quiet world of sleep one breath at a time. It feels so good until you’re awaken by your snoring partner. Suddenly, you’re back, wide awake, staring at your partner who is snoring like a mooing cow. You think to yourself, it’s unfair!

Snoring is many things, from that stealer of sleep to relationship saboteur. The pathology of what makes us snore is thankfully much simpler. When you fall asleep, all of the muscles and soft tissues in your neck, throat and airway relax. As you then inhale (our breathing rate is around 15 to 20 breaths a minute) the air is forced over these relaxed and floppy structures, causing them to vibrate. It is these vibrations that we hear as a snore.

(Via: https://www.gq-magazine.co.uk/article/snoring-remedies)

It’s normal to snore but it wouldn’t hurt to monitor the frequency of it.

Frequency of snoring is essentially intermittent or chronic. Intermittent snoring is often caused by something out of the ordinary for you, such as excessive alcohol, which relaxes your neck muscles even more and pushes you into a deeper sleep – it is a sedative, remember. Chronic snoring is more likely defined by fixed issues (although not, as you will see, entirely irremediable) such as only being able to sleep on your back or having a structural issue with your airway (like being punched in the face too many times).

(Via: https://www.gq-magazine.co.uk/article/snoring-remedies)

Snoring varies. Some aren’t so bad, while some can really be deafening. The severity of snoring can be graded from one to three, three being severe.

Grade-one (mild) snoring: This is infrequent snoring that has no health impact on you and may only lead to minor relationship issues.

Grade-two (moderate) snoring: This is snoring three or more days a week that may contribute to some daytime fatigue and more fatal relationship issues.

Grade-three (severe) snoring: This is heavy and loud snoring on a regular basis that can have physical, mental and social health problems – including obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) – and being dumped.

(Via: https://www.gq-magazine.co.uk/article/snoring-remedies)

Snoring can be very loud, depending on the grade.

A simple grade-one snoring is around 100 to 300Hz, which, compared to up to 1,000Hz for grade three (OSA territory), is a playful whisper.

(Via: https://www.gq-magazine.co.uk/article/snoring-remedies)

Not everybody who snores has sleep apnea. Nonetheless, snoring could be a sign of sleep apnea. That’s the reason why there’s a need to see a doctor if the snoring is frequent and severe. Sleep apnea is a serious health condition that needs immediate medical attention.

Snoring may be seen as

Humidifier: A Great Gift Even For A Snorer

Originally at: https://snoringmouthpiecereview.org/snorerx/humidifier-a-great-gift-even-for-a-snorer

Humidifiers are very popular nowadays. They’re everywhere. Who wouldn’t appreciate a humidifier? A humidifier brings a breath of fresh air into a room. It gives it a spa-like ambience.

A humidifier does more than just provide a spa-like ambience to a room. It’s actually pretty useful to have a humidifier especially during the winter season.

Humidifiers are getting quite popular these days, but before buying a humidifier you must ask yourself will I benefit from using a humidifier? A humidifier is an electronic device that is used to add moisture in the room. Humidifiers generally become a necessity during the winter season, when there are lower levels of humidity in the air and the heating systems dry out the air.

(Via: https://thefrisky.com/will-i-benefit-from-using-a-humidifier/)

If you’re thinking of a gift for a friend or a family member, a humidifier is a very practical choice. The recipient will surely love it. It’s a practical gift because of the many uses of this particular electronic device.

Other than just adding moisture in the air, humidifiers have several other benefits too.

(Via: https://thefrisky.com/will-i-benefit-from-using-a-humidifier/)

Here are the benefits of having a humidifier in the room. First and foremost, it relieves allergic symptoms.

Humidifiers are a great remedy to relieve the symptoms of different allergies. The past models of humidifiers add too much humidity into the air, which leads to the growth of certain fungi and bacteria. However, the latest models add a moderate level of moisture in the air. Average and balanced moisture soothes the nasal passages and throat and thus, the allergic person feels more comfortable.

Also, the latest models of humidifiers have a special system installed in them that kills certain germs and inhibits their growth.

(Via: https://thefrisky.com/will-i-benefit-from-using-a-humidifier/)

Humidifiers warms up the room.

According to studies, a humidified air is warmer as compared to the dry air. In the moist atmosphere, the sweat evaporates more slowly, that keep people warmer. Thus with the help of humidifiers, one can even save on the heating bills.

(Via: https://thefrisky.com/will-i-benefit-from-using-a-humidifier/)

Even your furniture will benefit.

Dry air dries out the wooden furniture and thus damages it by making it crack. In the wooden floor, it can even lead to loosening joints. Wooden door of the rooms and wardrobes change their size and it becomes difficult to open or close them, because of the joint loosening the arms and legs of chairs begin to wobble. All this is a result of too much moisture in the air or dry air. Wooden furniture requires a moderate and constant level of moisture to live longer and shine. A humidifier, when used properly with a

Share! Narcolepsy with Cataplexy PSA Video with Ode to Joy Movie

Originally at: http://julieflygare.com/share-narcolepsy-with-cataplexy-psa-video-with-ode-to-joy-movie/

Friends: I’m SO beyond thrilled to share the news with you today that Project Sleep proudly partnered with IFC Films and Ode to Joy Director, Jason Winer, to create a PSA to raise awareness about narcolepsy with cataplexy.

Please watch and share with friends!

Watch this video on YouTube.

Teamwork makes the dream work

I am so grateful to Jason and IFC for their enthusiasm and partnership. Creating this video was a team effort, with significant contributions by many thoughtful people. Most notably, a huge shout out to Hannah Powell for making this project a reality and working with myself and Project Sleep every step of the way!

How this came to be

Over the past year, I researched how other disease communities have worked with and responded to the film industry in similar situations. I interviewed health communications experts and people in “the industry.” I learned A LOT. (Honestly, it would be another post entirely to explain how eye-opening this process was, but I’ll link to my fav articles at the bottom of this post.)

Since Ode to Joy was in post-production as of late 2018, influencing the content of the actual film itself was unlikely. Experts advised me to focus “my asks” on the marketing and distribution phase. 

One of my key “asks” was to collaborate on a short PSA to raise awareness about narcolepsy with cataplexy surrounding the film’s release. Examples I’d seen included Netflix’s To The Bone Nine Truths PSA and The Emoji Movie‘s Stand Up to Bullying campaign.

Once in communication with Ode to Joy’s team, I presented “my asks” and director, Jason Winer, loved the PSA idea and quickly committed to working together to make this happen. This was a surreal moment! I’d spent months researching and formulating my asks, and now it was “go time!”

If you ask for what you want, you better be ready in case you get it!

I had ideas for the PSA and was happy to draft the script, but it was certainly a major undertaking! Jason and I decided to keep this to under one minute. My first draft was around 300 words and the final is about 140 words. I agonized over the pros and cons of each word choice with the help of a few close colleagues and friends.  

About a week before filming, Jason and I agreed that I would join him as “talent” in the PSA. This wasn’t my original plan, but ultimately it made sense, and I liked the idea of a real person with narcolepsy with cataplexy being in the video. 

On the morning …

Sleep Is A Serious Matter

Originally at: https://snoringmouthpiecereview.org/good-morning-snore-solution/sleep-is-a-serious-matter

Sleep. We take it for granted. Well, we shouldn’t. We can’t survive on just a few hours of sleep. Even if we try to, our health is going to suffer. We all need to get some good sleep, not just for one night but for every single night of our life. In other words, we all need to get quality sleep regularly.

Sleep is a natural physiological state of the body where our brain is inactive, muscles relaxed, and consciousness practically suspended. Sleep is an essential part of our routine and it helps the body ‘regenerate and rejuvenate’. We spend one third of our life in sleep and we never bother about it.

Sleep is important as our body undergoes a lot of changes during that time. It allows the body to rest, relieves tiredness, and most importantly restores our cognitive (thinking) ability. During sleep there is active hormone production, which is essential for good metabolism and maintaining homeostasis or body balance. In addition, there is a decrease in the heart rate, heart function and drop in blood pressure.

(Via: http://www.businessworld.in/article/Sleep-Apnea-/23-06-2019-172067/)

Question is, how much sleep do we actually need?

The American Association of Sleep Medicine has given guidelines as to the amount of sleep you require to promote optimal health:

-Infants and children- 10 -16 hours
-Teenagers- 9-10 hours
-Adults- 7-9 hours

(Via: http://www.businessworld.in/article/Sleep-Apnea-/23-06-2019-172067/)

Seven to nine hours of sleep is a lot for a busy adult. Face it. We’d be lucky enough to get five hours of sleep especially on a week day. The only time we can really catch up on sleep is on the weekend.

Even if we’re given the luxury of time to sleep, there are barriers. These barriers are making it very hard for us to get some sleep.

Lack of sleep brings about some serious consequences. Needless to say, these consequences could be deadly.

Unfortunately, sleep is a very underrated and under diagnosed problem. The consequences of sleep disorders involve multiple parts of the body including risk of stroke, heart attack, memory loss, depression to name a few. We do not have much data for our country, but the Western data shows that a significant number of their population is sleep deprived and has sleep disorders. Consequences of this include loss of productivity, road accidents, accidents at work place. In fact, the West has strict laws with sleep disorders and driving. One’s license is suspended till they comply with treatment.

(Via: http://www.businessworld.in/article/Sleep-Apnea-/23-06-2019-172067/)

It’s time we all look deeper as to why we can’t seem to get good sleep. For all we know, we might already be suffering …

Snoring: Causes And Complications Of It

Originally at: https://snoringmouthpiecereview.org/zquiet/snoring-causes-and-complications-of-it

Is snoring a problem of yours? If it’s not, then you’re pretty lucky. As a matter of fact, even your partner is pretty lucky if you don’t snore at all.

If snoring is a problem of yours, you’re not the only one suffering from it. You and a million adults are suffering from it as well

Nearly half of adults habitually snore when they sleep.

For some, it’s not a problem. For others, it may affect the quality of their bed partner’s rest. It can also be associated with sleep apnea, a condition affecting a person’s ability to breathe and the quality of their sleep.

(Via: https://news.psu.edu/story/554631/2019/01/16/medical-minute-causes-and-complications-snoring)

While you shouldn’t really worry about light snoring, it’s the heavy snoring that you should be worried about. It’s a sign that you might have a serious health condition. You really shouldn’t ignore it.

“It could be suggestive of something more going on,” said Dr. Neerav Goyal, director of head and neck surgery at Penn State Health.

(Via: https://news.psu.edu/story/554631/2019/01/16/medical-minute-causes-and-complications-snoring)

The vibrating nasal tissue is what causes the snoring sound. The more it vibrates, the louder the sound.

Snoring is caused by relaxed throat or nasal tissue that vibrates when it collapses while the body is horizontal during shut-eye.

“A lot of it has to do with how air flows through your nose and mouth,” Goyal said. “When we sleep, muscle tone lapses and tissues vibrate much as a reed does when you play a musical instrument.”

(Via: https://news.psu.edu/story/554631/2019/01/16/medical-minute-causes-and-complications-snoring)

There are various causes of snoring. Sleep position is one of the most common causes of it.

Those who sleep on their back are more prone to snoring than side sleepers because of how gravity collapses tissues and muscles in the airway. Sometimes sleeping propped up with a wedge pillow or in a recliner instead of horizontally can help lessen snoring.

(Via: https://news.psu.edu/story/554631/2019/01/16/medical-minute-causes-and-complications-snoring)

For some, snoring could be genetic.

For some, snoring is caused by a genetic anatomic obstruction such as a deviated septum, large tonsils, a floppy soft palate or a large neck circumference.

(Via: https://news.psu.edu/story/554631/2019/01/16/medical-minute-causes-and-complications-snoring)

Certain health disorders and diseases can also cause one to snore.

People with disorders such as cerebral palsy or degenerative diseases may be prone to snoring, because they have less muscle tone as-is. Medications (such as sedatives) and alcohol can also decrease muscle tone.

(Via: https://news.psu.edu/story/554631/2019/01/16/medical-minute-causes-and-complications-snoring)

Excessive weight or obesity can cause snoring as well.

Those who are overweight or obese with a body-mass index higher than 25 may also be at risk, because they may have extra tissue and weight around the airway.

(Via: https://news.psu.edu/story/554631/2019/01/16/medical-minute-causes-and-complications-snoring)

Allergies or …

Are Sleep and Happiness Related? Listen Now To Find Out!

Originally at: http://julieflygare.com/are-sleep-and-happiness-related-listen-now-to-find-out/

I was honored to be a guest on the More Happy Life Podcast with Andy Proctor recently. We talked sleep, spoons, narcolepsy, storytelling, happiness, dreams and more. Listen here.

Episode description: In this episode we talk about all things sleep and much more! How does sleep impact our energy, mood, and clarity? How much sleep do we need each night? How did you discover your narcolepsy? How can we improve our sleep patterns? Should naps be allowed and supported at work? Let’s talk about dreams and remembering dreams. What would you tell people who just found out they have narcolepsy? Find your self affirming voice within all the voices in your head. This will make you happier. 

It was such a joy to share this conversation with Andy and now I’m really enjoying listening to his other More Happy Life podcast episodes too! Listen to our conversation here.

from Blog – Julie Flygare http://julieflygare.com/are-sleep-and-happiness-related-listen-now-to-find-out/…

Dr. Christian Guilleminault on Upper Airway Resistance Syndrome Encore [Podcast 70]

Originally at: https://doctorstevenpark.com/guilleminaultencore

A Reason Why You May Be Chronically Sick and Tired

Dr. Christian Guilleminault

This week, I’m thrilled to play an encore of the interview I had in 2013 with one of the greatest sleep physicians of our time, Dr. Christian Guilleminault from Stanford University. He first described upper airway resistance syndrome (UARS) in 1993. Along with Dr. Dement, he co-coined the term, OSAS. Sadly, he recently passed as at the age of 80. This episode is a tribute to his incredible contributions and legacy to the sleep community.

Download mp3  |  Subscribe  

Shownotes

Original 1993 UARS paper

The post Dr. Christian Guilleminault on Upper Airway Resistance Syndrome Encore [Podcast 70] appeared first on Doctor Steven Y. Park, MD | New York, NY | Integrative Solutions for Obstructive Sleep Apnea, Upper Airway Resistance Syndrome, and Snoring.

from Doctor Steven Y. Park, MD | New York, NY | Integrative Solutions for Obstructive Sleep Apnea, Upper Airway Resistance Syndrome, and SnoringBlog – Doctor Steven Y. Park, MD | New York, NY | Integrative Solutions for Obstructive Sleep Apnea, Upper Airway Resistance Syndrome, and Snoring https://doctorstevenpark.com/guilleminaultencore…

Are You Exhausted When You Wake Up In The Morning?

Originally at: https://snoringmouthpiecereview.org/good-morning-snore-solution/are-you-exhausted-when-you-wake-up-in-the-morning

The alarm clock goes off. You can hardly open your eyes but you need to get up. Your body is begging for more sleep but you need to get up. Even if you do get up, you feel exhausted. The bad part is, your day is just beginning. So why are you feeling so exhausted already?

You know the consequences of not getting enough sleep: mood swings, crabbiness, cravings, difficulty focusing and sluggishness. And when you don’t know why you can’t get enough sleep, the symptoms become even more frustrating. The culprits behind sleepless nights range from blue light to parasites — but you might be dealing with something more serious: sleep apnea.

(Via: https://www.cnet.com/news/what-is-sleep-apnea-symptoms-causes-diagnosis-treatment/)

Sleep apnea is a sleep disorder. It’s hard to tell if you have it. So, it’s always better to see a doctor about it first. Don’t be scared because sleep apnea is a common problem.

An estimated 22 million Americans suffer from sleep apnea, a sleep disorder that causes you to momentarily stop breathing while you’re asleep. With sleep apnea, your airway becomes blocked when your body relaxes during sleep, limiting your lungs to little air flow.

(Via: https://www.cnet.com/news/what-is-sleep-apnea-symptoms-causes-diagnosis-treatment/)

Sleep apnea actually causes you to stop breathing while sleeping. So, even if you think you’ve slept long enough, you still feel exhausted when you wake up in the morning. This sleep disorder is also the reason why you snore so loud.

Characterized by loud snoring and often choking noises, sleep apnea causes your brain and body to become oxygen-deprived, often leading to frequent awakenings throughout the night. Depending on the case, it could happen a few times per night or hundreds of times each night.

(Via: https://www.cnet.com/news/what-is-sleep-apnea-symptoms-causes-diagnosis-treatment/)

Do you think you snore at night? If you have no idea about it, go ask your partner. Your partner should know. You can’t hide a snore, especially one that’s very loud. Nonetheless, loud snoring isn’t the only symptom of sleep apnea.

The most common symptom of sleep apnea is snoring, but snoring on its own isn’t always indicative of sleep apnea. Snoring followed by silent pauses, gasping or choking sounds is likely a sign of sleep apnea.

Because sleep apnea wakes you up frequently throughout the night (even if you don’t notice it), you can suffer from symptoms of sleep deprivation, such as daytime fatigue, difficulty concentrating, unintentional napping and irritability or mood swings.

Other symptoms include:

• Feeling tired, even when you thought you had a full night’s sleep
• Insomnia or trouble falling asleep
• Headaches and migraines
• Loss of memory
• Decreased sex drive

“Ode to Joy” Movie Review From A Person Living with Narcolepsy with Cataplexy

Originally at: http://julieflygare.com/ode-to-joy-movie-review-from-a-person-living-with-narcolepsy-with-cataplexy/

Today, the new feature film, Ode to Joy opens in select theaters (in New York and Los Angeles) and releases via video on demand across the United States. Ode to Joy is a movie about a man, Charlie (played by Martin Freeman) navigating romance while living with narcolepsy with cataplexy.

I was not involved in the development or filming of this movie, but I’ve been interested since the film was announced in 2011, based on the This American Life segment “I’m Fallen In Love and I Can’t Get Up.” This past April, I attended a showing of Ode to Joy at the Phoenix Film Festival, with Project Sleep board member, Ed Sweet.

As President & CEO of Project Sleep, seeing the film as soon as possible was important to me. Representations of narcolepsy in film provide valuable insight into public perceptions and understanding of the condition. For many individuals, cinematic depictions of narcolepsy may be their only exposure to the symptoms. Thus, patient-driven organizations like Project Sleep, along with narcolepsy advocates and medical professionals, will all benefit from being aware of movie portrayals and joining the conversation as much as possible.

As a person living with narcolepsy with cataplexy myself, I was nervous to see the film. Generally, I close my eyes when clinicians play videos of cataplexy at conferences. Also, I have a short YouTube playlist of other people’s cataplexy episodes and inevitably, tears stream down my face watching these.

Going into seeing the film for the first time, my burning questions were:

1.) How will the movie depict and describe cataplexy? 
2.) How will the movie depict and describe narcolepsy?
3.) How will it depict treatment?
4.) How will it depict the condition’s impact on life? 
5.) Will there be resources exemplified during the film or offered at the end?
6.) Will the film help to raise awareness and/or reduce stigma?
7.) Will I find the movie funny?

Here are my responses. WARNING: from this point on, this post contains spoilers.

1.) How will the movie depict and describe cataplexy?

Physical manifestations: 
I was curious to see how Martin Freeman might act out cataplexy on camera. Cataplexy is such a unique form of muscle weakness/paralysis that can be so sudden and jerky, even I find it hard to “re-enact” on purpose, even having lived with it for over 14 years now.

The physical manifestations of cataplexy in Ode to Joy ranged from accurate (i.e. a knee-buckling and crumbling inward/downward to the ground) to inaccurate (i.e. rigid plank tumbling backward). I would love to know how Freeman prepared for this role – what examples …

A Simple Way To A Good Night’s Sleep

Originally at: https://snoringmouthpiecereview.org/sleeptight/a-simple-way-to-a-good-nights-sleep

A good night’s sleep is a necessity. It’s not a luxury. You deserve to get a good night’s sleep every single night. It’s the only way your body can rest and rejuvenate for the next day.

Unfortunately, it’s not easy to get a good night’s sleep. There will some nights when your sleep is good and there will be some nights when your sleep is bad. If you’re a snorer, you probably have more nights of bad sleep. If you’re hardly getting any good night’s sleep, you’re going to get sick.

Snoring at night can not only be annoying but also health threatening and sometimes fatal. Many people don’t even know that they snore. Therefore, they are never diagnosed with sleep apnea, a disorder in which breathing starts and stops during sleep.

(Via: https://www.abc4.com/gtu/a-cure-to-help-you-get-a-good-nights-sleep/)

The best way to really know if you snore is to ask your partner. Your partner is not going to lie about it. No one lies about snoring, especially if it’s loud and annoying.

So, if your partner says you snore, accept it and decide to do something about it. Don’t even attempt to deny it because the sooner you deal with your snoring, the better it is for your health and your relationship. Keep in mind that sleep apnea is a serious health problem.

Sleep apnea has been connected to heart disease, stroke, high blood pressure, diabetes and also depression. It even causes about 38,000 deaths each year. This is a serious disorder …

(Via: https://www.abc4.com/gtu/a-cure-to-help-you-get-a-good-nights-sleep/)

Don’t let snoring get in the way of a good night’s sleep. A good night’s sleep is the key to an awesome day ahead. Don’t miss out the opportunity of facing it.

A good night’s sleep is also good for your health. If you ignore your snoring, your health can suffer.

Most importantly, your snoring might ruin the loving relationship you have with your partner. Don’t let it reach that point.

Don’t let sleep apnea scare you. Yes, it is a serious health problem but it can be cured. Continuous Positive Airway Pressure or CPAP machines are the most common equipment used to cure sleep apnea. Wearing this particular machine can help stop snoring. However, it’s not the most convenient way to get a good night’s sleep. You might even find it uncomfortable to wear.

A CPAP machine comes with a mask that’s attached to a machine. When you wear the mask, it’s going to cover your whole face. It’s not exactly the sexiest thing to wear in bed but it’s going to help lessen, if not, stop your snoring.

There’s an …