Could These Mouth Workouts Stop Snoring?

Originally at: https://snoringmouthpiecereview.org/snorerx/could-these-mouth-workouts-stop-snoring

Have you ever heard of mouth workouts? Apparently, they exist and they’re supposed to help stop snoring. The question is, do they actually work?

Before we get into that, here’s a little trivia for you. Did you know that men snore more than women? Yes, they do.

Around 40 per cent of men over 30 snore and around 30 per cent of women do.

(Via: https://www.thesun.co.uk/fabulous/8842466/simple-workout-stop-snoring/)

Of course, that doesn’t delete the fact that women snore as well. There just less women who snore.

It’s really not a matter of who snores more or who snores less. The point is, there is always someone who snores and that could be you. Snoring is not something that we should take lightly.

If left untreated, it can turn into sleep apnea – a potentially life-threatening sleeping disorder which sees people have heart attacks in the middle of the night.

(Via: https://www.thesun.co.uk/fabulous/8842466/simple-workout-stop-snoring/)

So, if you snore or you know of someone who snores, it’s time to incorporate some mouth workouts before going to sleep.

Because one expert maintains that not only is snoring a voluntary habit but also that it can be treated with a five-minute workout.

Mike Dilkes is an ear, nose and throat surgeon at London’s Hospital of St John and St Elizabeth, and he’s been telling the Telegraph that while snoring is “not a habit you may choose to have…(it’s) one you can choose to stop”.

(Via: https://www.thesun.co.uk/fabulous/8842466/simple-workout-stop-snoring/)

If this is the first time you’ve heard of mouth workouts to stop snoring, then why not give it shot? After all, snoring is not something we should all take lightly.

So it’s not just that snoring is annoying for everyone else to hear and can sometimes disrupt our own sleep, it can be really dangerous.

(Via: https://www.thesun.co.uk/fabulous/8842466/simple-workout-stop-snoring/)

Snoring happens because the muscles of the throat relax and collapse while the body is asleep. With the workout exercises, the muscles can get fit again.

Mike says that snoring is often caused by a loss of muscle tone; at night, everything relaxes and collapses. But that collapse can be reduced by exercising the throat.

(Via: https://www.thesun.co.uk/fabulous/8842466/simple-workout-stop-snoring/)

Hence, Mike has come up with some interesting mouth workouts that are supposed to strengthen the muscles in your mouth to prevent snoring,

Mike has come up with a revolutionary tongue and throat workout designed to tone up the bits in your neck that cause snoring.

Sure, it won’t cure those snoring cases caused by things like enlarged nostrils, but he does claim that the workout will help to reduce the volume.

And when the average snore can

Sleep Talk: Episode 42 – What to Eat

Originally at: https://sleephub.com.au/podcast-42/

Episode 42: What to Eat

How does what we eat impact on sleep? What foods or types of diet can help with sleep? To help decipher this complex area we talk to Assoc Prof Marie-Pierre St-Onge, Director Sleep Center of Excellence Columbia University, Irving Medical Center.

Dr Moira Junge (Health Psychologist) and Dr David Cunnington (Sleep Physician) host the monthly podcast, Sleep Talk, talking all things sleep.

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Audio Timeline / Chapters:

  • 00:00 – 01:41 Introduction
  • 01:41 – 23:04 Theme – What to eat?
  • 23:04 – 25:45 Clinical Tip
  • 25:45 – 29:31 Pick of the Month
  • 29:31 – 30:39 What’s Coming Up?

Next episode: Sleep Research Update

Links mentioned in the podcast: 

Presenters:

Guest interviews:

Marie-Pierre St-Onge

Assoc Prof Marie-Pierre St-Onge is Centre Director of Columbia University Irving Medical Center, Sleep Center of Excellence. A Prof St-Onge has a Ph.D focused in Nutrition from McGill University and is a Fellow of the American Heart Association and Certified in Clinical Sleep Health. In 2007, A Prof St-Onge received NIH funding to study sleep and energy balance and her research now focuses greatly on sleep and its association with obesity and cardiometabolic risk factors. Her research findings show that sleep influences diet and that diet may also influence sleep, allowing her to return to her original passion related to foods and their influence on disease risk.

Regular hosts:

Dr Moira JungeDr Moira Junge is a health psychologist working in the sleep field, who has considerable experience working with people with sleeping difficulties in a multidisciplinary practice using a team-based approach. Moira is actively involved with the Australasian Sleep Association (ASA) and a board member of the Sleep Health Foundation. She has presented numerous workshops for psychologists and is involved with Monash University with teaching and supervision commitments. She is one of the founders and clinic directors at Yarraville Health Group which was established in 1998. In addition to her expertise in sleep disorders, her other areas of interest and expertise include smoking cessation, psychological adjustment to chronic illness, and grief and loss issues.

 

Dr David CunningtonDr David Cunnington is a sleep physician and director of Melbourne Sleep Disorders Centre, and co-founder and contributor to SleepHub. David trained in sleep medicine both in Australia and in the United States, at Harvard Medical School, and …

The Blatant Signs Of Deadly Snoring

Originally at: https://snoringmouthpiecereview.org/snorerx/the-blatant-signs-of-deadly-snoring

A lot of people snore. As a matter of fact, a big percentage of the American population snores.

An estimated 40% of adults in the U.S. snore. And, men, you tend to out-snore women. (Yes, this may explain why you get kicked or shoved at night!)

(Via: https://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2019/04/22/714249236/beyond-annoying-how-to-identify-the-sounds-of-a-troublesome-snore)

Contrary to what other people think that snoring is a sign of deep sleep, it’s not.

And despite the myth that snoring is a sign of deep sleep, there’s really no upside to it.

“Snoring really does not demonstrate anything good, ” says Erich Voigt, an ear, nose, and throat doctor and sleep specialist at New York University Langone Health. “You can have beautifully deep sleep in a silent sleep.”

(Via: https://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2019/04/22/714249236/beyond-annoying-how-to-identify-the-sounds-of-a-troublesome-snore)

Snoring can be a sign of a more serious health condition but that doesn’t mean everybody who snores is in trouble. There are some cases where snoring is harmless. Nonetheless, there are some cases where snoring is an indication of something more serious.

Snoring is never great news, but often it’s harmless (other than the pain your sleeping partner may feel). In some cases, though, it’s a sign of something serious.

(Via: https://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2019/04/22/714249236/beyond-annoying-how-to-identify-the-sounds-of-a-troublesome-snore)

Snoring happens when the airways in the nose and in the mouth become narrow. With the airways obstructed, the tissues in the said areas end up vibrating.  That vibration contributes to the sound of a snore.

When we sleep, if the air that moves through our nose and mouth has a clear passage, we can sleep silently. But when the airways are narrowed, we snore.

“Snoring is basically a vibration of the tissues inside of the airway,” Voigt explains — that is, the roof of the mouth and the vertical folds of tissue that surround the tonsils.

(Via: https://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2019/04/22/714249236/beyond-annoying-how-to-identify-the-sounds-of-a-troublesome-snore)

Alcohol intake is one of the many reasons why people snore. If alcohol intake is limited, it can lessen the snoring. That just shows that snoring can be controlled and treated.

A lot of factors can contribute to snoring, says Voigt. We can control some of the underlying triggers. For instance, drinking alcohol is linked to snoring. Alcohol tends to make the tissues within our mouths swell a bit, and alcohol can also change the quality of sleep.

“Your brain is sedated from alcohol, so the combination can make you snore worse,” Voigt says.

(Via: https://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2019/04/22/714249236/beyond-annoying-how-to-identify-the-sounds-of-a-troublesome-snore)

Weight gain could also contribute to snoring. That means shedding off some pounds could help lessen the snoring.

Being overweight can also increase the likelihood of snoring. So, when people lose weight, this can reduce the amount they snore.

(Via: https://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2019/04/22/714249236/beyond-annoying-how-to-identify-the-sounds-of-a-troublesome-snore)

Lessening …