Listen Now: CALM + COZY podcast interview

Originally at: http://julieflygare.com/listen-now-calm-cozy-podcast-interview/

Apparently I felt comfortable and a bit snarky on the day that I recorded this CALM + COZY podcast interview with the amazing host, Beth Wyatt (@sleepcoachbeth on IG), because I’m pretty honest and animated here!

Beth asked great questions that led to unique conversations not part of my usual “talking points” repertoire. My favorite discussion came after Beth asked:

“What advice would you give someone approaching their primary care doctor about a possible sleep disorder?”

I’d love to hear YOUR thoughts on this topic too. It’s not always easy to get primary care doctors to consider a sleep consult. 

Beth: Thank you for this terrific opportunity to share my story and my passion for Project Sleep. I’m forever grateful to call you my friend and fellow sleep advocate!

Listen to the podcast interview now and let me know what you think in the comments below!

from Blog – Julie Flygare http://julieflygare.com/listen-now-calm-cozy-podcast-interview/…

Sleep Solutions You Can Try

Originally at: https://snoringmouthpiecereview.org/good-morning-snore-solution/sleep-solutions-you-can-try

We all want to get some sleep. We need it. There’s no way we can function well if we are sleep deprived. Sleeping is as important as eating. If we’re not getting any sleep, we are useless.

One of the common reasons as to why we cannot get any sleep is that we snore or we’re sleeping beside one who does.

Around 40% of adult men and 24% of adult women snore regularly. The odds are you or your significant other fall into this group of loud sleepers.

(Via: https://theurbantwist.com/2019/06/12/search-for-the-ultimate-snore-silencer-5-solutions-to-help-you-sleep/)

Snoring can really ruin the quality of our sleep. If you’re sleeping beside one who snores, you won’t even be able to get any sleep at all. Not a wink for you and that’s bad for you, your partner, and your health.

While you’ve promised to stay by each other’s side through thick and thin, the snoring may be testing your patience.

(Via: https://theurbantwist.com/2019/06/12/search-for-the-ultimate-snore-silencer-5-solutions-to-help-you-sleep/)

There are solutions you can try. If you’re not the snorer, you can certainly share these solutions with someone who snores. Chances are, that someone could be your partner. Sharing these solutions is a better way to deal with the situation rather resenting your snoring partner.

You can always try sleeping in separate bedrooms but that’s a very temporary solution. Sleeping away from your snoring partner is just going to help you. It will not, in any way, help your snoring partner. As a matter of fact, it might even hurt your snoring partner.

If your partner snores heavily, the more he or she will need you to stay close by. Heavy snoring is a manifestation of stoppage of breathing. As annoying as it may sound, you may need to wake up your snoring partner when you hear him or her struggle for air.

One solution that you can consider for your partner or for yourself (that is, if you’re a heavy snorer), is the CPAP machine.

First of all, you should check to make sure your snoring isn’t a result of something more serious, such as sleep apnea. This disorder can lead to potentially fatal problems, so get an exam to eliminate this as a cause of snoring.

If you do find out you have sleep apnea, you can get a CPAP machine to help you breathe at night. Not only will it get rid of your snoring, but it can also help you feel more refreshed in the morning.

(Via: https://theurbantwist.com/2019/06/12/search-for-the-ultimate-snore-silencer-5-solutions-to-help-you-sleep/)

A CPAP machine is for more severe cases of snoring. Only a doctor can really recommend this solution.

This next solution is a more natural way to …

Say Goodbye To Snoring With Oral Appliance Therapy

Originally at: https://snoringmouthpiecereview.org/snorerx/oral-appliance-therapy

There’s a solution to your snoring problem. It’s called Oral Appliance Therapy. According to dentist, Dr. Micheal Uzelac, Oral Appliance Therapy works.

Uzelac, who had been diagnosed with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), had an oral appliance made to help reduce his disrupted breathing during sleep due to snoring. It worked.

“I slept soundly for three nights in a row, and I felt wonderful,” he said.

(Via: https://www.valpolife.com/health/specialty/73600-oral-appliances-help-reduce-or-eliminate-snoring)

Oral Appliance Therapy may not be the common solution to snoring. Dr. Uzelac states that using a CPAP machine is the most common way to treat snoring. A CPAP machine can help reduce disrupted breathing during sleep.

“The most common treatment for obstructive sleep apnea right now is the CPAP machine,” Uzelac said. Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP) involves wearing a mask or nasal cannula connected to a machine that delivers pressured air during sleep.

(Via: https://www.valpolife.com/health/specialty/73600-oral-appliances-help-reduce-or-eliminate-snoring)

CPAP machines may be popular but they’re not well-liked by snorers who are looking for a more comfortable and presentable way to solve their problem.

“The problem is, about 58% of people who are prescribed a CPAP machine don’t wear it,” Uzelac said. Some perceive the devices to be bulky, cumbersome, and uncomfortable.

(Via: https://www.valpolife.com/health/specialty/73600-oral-appliances-help-reduce-or-eliminate-snoring)

A better way to approach OSA and snoring is with the use of an oral appliance that could be custom-fitted to your mouth.

“With obstructive sleep apnea, the muscles in the throat relax and block breathing. Oral appliance therapy works like putting a door stop in a door,” Uzelac said. “The appliances help pull the jaw forward so the muscles can’t relax and block breathing.”

More than 100 oral appliances are approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the treatment of OSA. They look like retainers or mouth guards, and simply fit over the upper and lower teeth.

(Via: https://www.valpolife.com/health/specialty/73600-oral-appliances-help-reduce-or-eliminate-snoring)

Take note that oral appliance therapy is best for folks who aren’t suffering from severe apnea. Here’s what Dr. Uzelac has to say about it.

Uzelac said those who tend to respond best to oral appliance therapy are those with less severe apnea, women ages 30 or older who are physically fit, and individuals who have a neck size of less than 17 inches. He stressed that addressing whole health is important in successful treatment of OSA.

(Via: https://www.valpolife.com/health/specialty/73600-oral-appliances-help-reduce-or-eliminate-snoring)

Your weight has a lot to do with your snoring. If you’re overweight, it can cause you to snore excessively. Even worse, it can lead to OSA.

Patients who suffer from OSA and excessive snoring many times are overweight and have other contributing factors like uncontrolled blood sugar (diabetes), and poor sleep

Snoring: When Should You Worry About It?

Originally at: https://snoringmouthpiecereview.org/good-morning-snore-solution/snoring-when-should-you-worry-about-it

Snorers are often the butt of jokes. We make fun of them but in reality, they’re not funny at all. As a matter of fact, they probably need more of our help than our usual sarcasm about their snoring. For all we know, the snoring could be a sign of something more serious.

No matter how you define it, snoring is a common habit for both men and women. It’s typically most common for men, but for any person, your chances of snoring start to increase as you get older. Although this problem is usually just mildly annoying (or funny), there are times when snoring can be related to a serious condition called sleep apnea.

(Via: https://www.ajc.com/lifestyles/here-when-you-should-worry-about-your-snoring/QOtVsZCyycYpD8qa07MPSP/)

While snorers may look and sound funny while sleeping, they’re actually struggling to catch some air.

WebMD says that people snore when there’s a physical obstruction interrupting the flow of air through the mouth and nose.

(Via: https://www.ajc.com/lifestyles/here-when-you-should-worry-about-your-snoring/QOtVsZCyycYpD8qa07MPSP/)

The causes of physical obstruction are the following:

1. Blocked nasal passages – Mucous or physical growths or changes in your nasal cavity can change the flow of air through your system.
2. Bulky throat tissue – If you’re slightly overweight or if you have large tonsils, you’re more likely to snore.
3. Poor muscle tone – If the muscles in your throat or tongue are too relaxed, they can collapse and get in the way as air is passing through. As you get older, these muscles start to relax more.
4. Long soft plate and/or uvula – This tissue can narrow the opening from your nose to your throat. It dangles in the back of your mouth and, when they bump against each other, it can block your airway, which causes snoring.

(Via: https://www.ajc.com/lifestyles/here-when-you-should-worry-about-your-snoring/QOtVsZCyycYpD8qa07MPSP/)

While it’s natural for everyone to snore, we really shouldn’t make fun of a snore that is unusually loud. An unusually loud snore is something we should really worry about.

If your snoring is louder than normal, you wake up feeling tired and your breathing stops and starts throughout the night, it’s possible you might have a form of sleep apnea.

There are three kinds of sleep apnea. Aurora Health Care defines obstructive sleep apnea as “a condition where people experience brief pauses of breathing during sleep, causing a drop in oxygen levels.” There is also central sleep apnea, which happens when your brain doesn’t send the right signals to the muscles that control your breathing, and complex sleep apnea syndrome, which is a combination of the two.

(Via: https://www.ajc.com/lifestyles/here-when-you-should-worry-about-your-snoring/QOtVsZCyycYpD8qa07MPSP/)

Considering the three kinds of sleep apnea, there’s no doubt that it’s …

How Light Can Be Good, Bad, Or Ugly [Podcast 68]

Originally at: https://doctorstevenpark.com/how-light-can-be-good-bad-or-ugly-podcast-68

In this episode, Kathy and I have an enlightening discussion about the good, bad, and ugly aspects of light. Some of the topics covered will be:

  • How light exposure can affect your appetite hormones and cause weight gain
  • How sun exposure may lower your risk of cancer
  • Why working at night may increase your risk for cancer.
  • How new technology is ruining our sleep and making us fat
  • How to use natural sunlight to sleep better and stay thin.

Download mp3 |  Subscribe |  Transcript

Shownotes:

Lights Out book by TS Wiley

Blue blocking glasses

F.lux – Computer screen blue light filter

Bright light box for seasonal affective disorder

7 Ways Black Electrical Tape Can Help You Sleep Better

Nobel 2017 award in medicine and physiology

Vitamin D levels and risk of cancer study

Addressing the health benefits and risks, involving vitamin D or skin cancer, of increased sun exposure 

Sunscreen SPF guide on EWG

 

The post How Light Can Be Good, Bad, Or Ugly [Podcast 68] appeared first on Doctor Steven Y. Park, MD | New York, NY | Integrative Solutions for Obstructive Sleep Apnea, Upper Airway Resistance Syndrome, and Snoring.

from Doctor Steven Y. Park, MD | New York, NY | Integrative Solutions for Obstructive Sleep Apnea, Upper Airway Resistance Syndrome, and SnoringBlog – Doctor Steven Y. Park, MD | New York, NY | Integrative Solutions for Obstructive Sleep Apnea, Upper Airway Resistance Syndrome, and Snoring https://doctorstevenpark.com/how-light-can-be-good-bad-or-ugly-podcast-68…

Can This Smart Strap Actually Stop Snoring?

Originally at: https://snoringmouthpiecereview.org/blog/can-this-smart-strap-actually-stop-snoring

Snoring is such a big deal nowadays. Well, it should be. Considering the high percentage of habitual snorers these days, it’s high time we take snoring seriously.

According to research, 40-percent of adult men and 24-percent of adult women snore habitually. It’s cited as a key issue in preventing people from getting a solid night’s rest, either because they themselves are snoring, or the person next to them are.

(Via: https://www.slashgear.com/philips-sleepsmart-snoring-relief-band-health-implications-sleep-apnoea-26574840/)

Snoring not just affects the snorer. It also affects other people who are bothered by the loud noise. It’s hard to sleep with someone who snores. No one gets quality sleep with a snorer around. That pretty much contributes to the reason why snoring is such a big deal these days.

It all sounds faintly ridiculous, but snoring is a big deal – both in terms of annual relief spending, and for potential long term health implications. Snoring can be a strong risk factor for hypertension, for instance, while if left untreated it can eventually lead to Obstructive Sleep Apnoea, or OSA. That’s where the walls of the throat narrow during sleep, making it harder to breathe.

(Via: https://www.slashgear.com/philips-sleepsmart-snoring-relief-band-health-implications-sleep-apnoea-26574840/)

OSA is a serious disease. It can lead to other health issues that could be deadly at some point.

Over time, OSA can lead to an increased risk of stroke or heart attack, to atrial fibrillation, and even make it more likely that you’ll develop type 2 diabetes.

(Via: https://www.slashgear.com/philips-sleepsmart-snoring-relief-band-health-implications-sleep-apnoea-26574840/)

That explains why there is an urgent need to stop snoring.

Stopping snoring isn’t going to instantly prevent all that from happening, but it’s a good first step, and doctors typically look at snoring as an early symptom that there’s something going wrong when you’re in bed.

(Via: https://www.slashgear.com/philips-sleepsmart-snoring-relief-band-health-implications-sleep-apnoea-26574840/)

The question is, can a smart strap like the Phillips’ Smart Snoring Relief Band actually stop snoring? Before we answer that, let’s take a close look at it first.

The latest addition to the company’s sleep-focused range, the Philips SleepSmart Snoring Relief Band replaces giving your bedmate a swift kick when they’re making too much noise.

Unlike straps that claim to keep your nasal passages more open, or bizarre headgear, the snoring relief band takes a more straightforward approach. People typically snore when they’re lying on their front or back, but not when they’re on their side.

So, Philips’ band basically tracks when you’re lying on your back, and encourages you to shift to your side. To do that, it promises to gently vibrate. Not enough to actually wake you up, but just enough of a disturbance to get you to change position.

A Sad Day for Sleep Medicine

Originally at: https://doctorstevenpark.com/a-sad-day-for-sleep-medicine Dr. Christian Guilleminault

I was extremely saddened to hear that Dr. Christian Guilleminault, one of the major pioneers in the field of sleep medicine, recent passed away at the age of 80. He was the first to coin the term, obstructive sleep apnea syndrome. A prolific researcher with countless publications, he was a mentor and friend to numerous sleep medicine and other related healthcare professionals. 

Dr. Guilleminault radically changed my perspective on how I look at sleep apnea when I read his landmark article on upper airway resistance syndrome (UARS). He showed in sleepy, thin young men and women that they can stop breathing and wake up dozens of time every hour without meeting the formal criteria for apneas. This was shown using esophageal pressure catheters, which detected progressively lower chest pressures with successive breaths, ending with brain wave arousals from deep to light sleep.

UARS patients present differently from classic sleep apnea patients, with severe chronic fatigue (but not drowsiness), headaches, anxiety depression, low blood pressure, cold hands and feet, hypothyroidism, or digestive issues. 

He was also one of the first to describe sleep apnea in young children, attributed sleep-walking to sleep apnea, and was instrumental in collaborating with surgeons at Stanford University legitimizing surgical options for sleep apnea. He was influential in shifting sleep doctors’ thinking from looking at sleep apnea mainly due to obesity to craniofacial factors. 

I was privileged to have interviewed Dr. Guilleminault about UARS many years ago on my podcast. To hear the recording, please click here.

Thank you Dr. Guillminault for opening my eyes to the importance of good breathing for good sleep. 

The post A Sad Day for Sleep Medicine appeared first on Doctor Steven Y. Park, MD | New York, NY | Integrative Solutions for Obstructive Sleep Apnea, Upper Airway Resistance Syndrome, and Snoring.

from Doctor Steven Y. Park, MD | New York, NY | Integrative Solutions for Obstructive Sleep Apnea, Upper Airway Resistance Syndrome, and SnoringBlog – Doctor Steven Y. Park, MD | New York, NY | Integrative Solutions for Obstructive Sleep Apnea, Upper Airway Resistance Syndrome, and Snoring https://doctorstevenpark.com/a-sad-day-for-sleep-medicine…

When Snoring Becomes Deadly

Originally at: https://snoringmouthpiecereview.org/good-morning-snore-solution/when-snoring-becomes-deadly

We know that snoring kills. If it isn’t addressed and treated, it can lead to a lot of health complications that can eventually kill the snorer.

However, we don’t really hear a lot of stories on snorers being murdered for the obvious and annoying reason that they snore. Hopefully, there aren’t a lot of stories on it but unfortunately, there’s one that came out on May 1.

A woman at a UK hospital died two weeks after a hotheaded patient whacked her in the head because she was annoyed by her snoring, a report said.

(Via: https://nypost.com/2019/05/01/woman-dies-in-hospital-after-patient-attacks-her-for-snoring/)

Now, that is one sad news. Needless to say, it’s a senseless murder. How could anyone kill anyone and for what? For snoring? It’s totally absurd but it’s true. It happened.

Mom of five Eileen Bunting, 64, was attacked and hit in the head with a cup while she was in a hospital bed at the Hull Royal Infirmary in Hull, England, on March 22, The Sun reported.

Bunting, who was left with a bloody gash on her forehead, was slated to be released from the hospital the day after the attack, but after she was assaulted, her health quickly declined.

She died April 4, according to the news outlet.

(Via: https://nypost.com/2019/05/01/woman-dies-in-hospital-after-patient-attacks-her-for-snoring/)

Apparently, Bunting’s snoring had become a serious issue for one patient who just couldn’t take it anymore. The sad part is that the attack seemed like it was well-laid out.

The victim’s son told local media that he believed the assault was a “premeditated” attack after it was discovered that the unidentified patient who went after his mother had tied the hospital room’s door handles together to prevent anyone from coming inside.

“The nurses must have been doing the rounds, noticed the doors were shut and found my mom full of blood and her stood over her with a cup,” Bunting’s son, Mark Bunting, told Hull Live, according to the report.
“The doors had been pulled to and tied together with a blanket and then she proceeded to attack my mom. It was premeditated,” the devastated son said.

(Via: https://nypost.com/2019/05/01/woman-dies-in-hospital-after-patient-attacks-her-for-snoring/)

It seems pretty surreal to think that anyone could kill for the simple reason of snoring. Based on the news report, it can really happen. A patient actually got fed up with the snoring and decided to do something about it. Sad to say, that something was a deadly way to deal with the snoring. Now that is downright scary.

Bunting’s husband, Philip, was adamant that the woman who attacked his wife did it over her snoring.

“Apparently the night before, another patient said the

How Sleep Affects Your Hormones [Podcast 67]

Originally at: https://doctorstevenpark.com/hormones

In this episode, Kathy and I will talk about a very common topic, hormones. In particular, how lack of sleep can negatively affect all your hormones, which can potentially aggravate weight gain, poor energy, and increased stress.

Download mp3  |  Subscribe |  Transcript

Shownotes

Hormones covered:

  • Thyroid
  • Estrogen and progesterone
  • Cortisol
  • Melatonin
  • Atrial natriuretic peptide
  • Insulin
  • Grehlin and leptin
  • Vitamin D
  • Growth hormone

Feeling Fat, Fuzzy or Frazzled, by Dr. Richard Shames

Atrial Natriuretic Peptide article by Dr. Deb Wardly

Vitamin D interview with Dr. Stasha Gominak

Sicker, fatter, Poorer by Dr. Leo Trasande

Sleep, Interrupted by Dr. Steven Y. Park

Second Spring by Dr. Maoshing Ni

The Woman Code by Alyssa Vitti 

The Wisdom of Menopause by Dr. Christiane Northrup 

Keep Swimming Clip in Finding Nemo

https://doctorstevenpark.com/hormones

Breathe Better Sleep Better Live better Podcast 

The post How Sleep Affects Your Hormones [Podcast 67] appeared first on Doctor Steven Y. Park, MD | New York, NY | Integrative Solutions for Obstructive Sleep Apnea, Upper Airway Resistance Syndrome, and Snoring.

from Doctor Steven Y. Park, MD | New York, NY | Integrative Solutions for Obstructive Sleep Apnea, Upper Airway Resistance Syndrome, and SnoringBlog – Doctor Steven Y. Park, MD | New York, NY | Integrative Solutions for Obstructive Sleep Apnea, Upper Airway Resistance Syndrome, and Snoring https://doctorstevenpark.com/hormones…

Snoring: A Problem For Both Men And Women

Originally at: https://snoringmouthpiecereview.org/good-morning-snore-solution/snoring-a-problem-for-both-men-and-women

Ladies, listen up. If you find yourselves complaining about how bad your boyfriend or hubby snores, stop for a moment. Make sure that you don’t snore because if you do, well, your boyfriend or hubby could be complaining about it as well. Be careful with what you say because you could be a snorer as well.

It turns out that men are not the only ones that snore according to a new study.

“We found that although no difference in snoring intensity was found between genders, women tend to underreport the fact that they snore and to underestimate the loudness of their snoring,” said Dr. Nimrod Maimon.

The study found that 88 percent of women snore, but only 72 percent admit to doing so. 93 percent of men both snored and reported snoring.

(Via: http://www.wlsam.com/2019/04/30/snoring-not-just-an-issue-for-men/)

So, ladies, face it. You probably snore as well. Maybe not as loud as your partner but you probably snore as well. Admitting it can be hard but it’s a good start if you really want to solve your snoring problem.

No one wants to admit that he or she is a snorer. After all, snoring is not something anyone would be proud of doing. It’s embarrassing to snore. For a lady to snore, it’s a total turn off.

The thing is, everybody snores. It’s a fact. No one can deny that. So instead of putting the blame on your boyfriend or husband, take the first step to see if you snore as well. Then deal with it.

Ladies, just because your snoring isn’t as loud as your partner’s doesn’t mean you shouldn’t get any help. The fact is, there are real dangers to consider with snoring.

“The fact that women reported snoring less often and described it as milder may be one of the barriers preventing women from reaching sleep clinics for a sleep study,” Dr. Maimon said.
Snoring can be due to sleep apnea, a sleeping disorder that can lead to an array of health issues.

(Via: http://www.wlsam.com/2019/04/30/snoring-not-just-an-issue-for-men/)

Snoring can lead to a lot of health problems. Before getting to that point, it’s best to treat it as soon as possible.

Going to a sleep clinic is a good way to treat snoring but it can take some time. Most likely, you don’t have a lot of time to spare. There is another alternative for you. It’s actually a more practical way to deal with your snoring.

Wearing a snoring mouthpiece while sleeping can really help a lot. If you’re not familiar with snoring mouthpieces, then it’s time to familiarize yourself with them. For starters, snoring …