Sleep Well in a Heat Wave

Originally at: https://www.sleepdallas.com/blog/sleep-well-heat-wave/

Summertime – it’s here! Bring on the longer days filled with sunshine, busy schedules, staying up late to socialize, vacations and other adventures. Unfortunately, the season of jam-packed schedules and distractions can make it harder to stick to a consistent sleep schedule and hotter temperatures can make sleep elusive and less refreshing. Don’t despair, though! With a few mindful changes, you can find yourself back on track and waking up with the energy you need to take on the season. Follow these tips to help ensure a good night’s sleep during the hottest of summer nights.

Keep the thermostat in the 60s. Do not be tempted to move your thermostat to the 70s to save money during sleep. Good sleep will make you more productive, so don’t trip over dollars to pick up nickels. If you don’t have air conditioning, make sure to use a fan to keep the air circulating.

Take advantage of the cooler mornings to get outside and reset your circadian rhythms. The sunshine can help reduce troubles falling asleep and help  eliminate the urge to stay up late. This will increase your sleep drive in the evenings when you need melatonin release and proper preparation for sleep.

Reduce light indoors. As daylight hangs around longer, bringing rays into your living quarters deep into the evening, you need to consider darkening the inside environment of your home by dimming the inside lights about an hour before your desired sleep time. Blackout curtains are a good option if you’re willing to make the investment, but a sleep mask works to block out light as well. This will help mimic those times hundreds of years ago when we would sleep as soon as darkness prevailed.

Avoid screen time before bed. Much like you need to dim the lights in a room before bed, it’s important to avoid light exposure from electronic screens. Electronic devices emit blue light, which can trick your body into thinking it’s daytime. Switch them out for a relaxing wind-down ritual like reading a book or having a cup of tea.

Use breathable bedding. Bedding plays a crucial role in helping your body cool down enough to sleep. During the summer in particular it can be helpful to use a lighter blanket than during other times of the year. The type of material your sheets are made of can make a difference too–look for sheets derived from natural fibers, made from lightweight cotton or bamboo or those with moisture-wicking properties or microfiber.

Keep a consistent bedtime routine. Although it can be tempting during the summer to change your routine for vacations or

4 Surprising Reasons Why You Snore

Originally at: https://snoringmouthpiecereview.org/good-morning-snore-solution/4-surprising-reasons-why-you-snore

Do you ever wonder why you snore? Are you one of those folks who think sheer exhaustion is the reason for snoring? Well, if you are; think again. Sheer exhaustion is not the cause of your snoring.

There are 4 surprising reasons why you snore. One of these surprising reasons is your weight.

No one likes to talk about their waistline, but it is something to remember when trying to cut down on snoring. According to the National Sleep Foundation, “Being overweight leads to poor muscle tone and increases the tissue around the neck and throat.” With regular physical activity and a balanced diet, these muscles will become stronger and snoring may begin to decrease.

(Via: https://valleycentral.com/sponsored/spotlight/4-factors-that-contribute-to-snoring-and-simple-steps-for-a-good-nights-sleep)

Another probable cause of your snoring is your alcohol intake. Maybe it’s time to cut down on it.

Having a little too much to drink before bedtime can bring on snoring. Alcohol relaxes the throat muscles, therefore lowering defense against airway obstruction. If you are planning on drinking, consider having your glass of wine a few hours before bed or avoid consuming alcohol altogether.

(Via: https://valleycentral.com/sponsored/spotlight/4-factors-that-contribute-to-snoring-and-simple-steps-for-a-good-nights-sleep)

Your sleeping position could also be the reason why you snore. Apparently, sleeping on your back can make you snore more.

Everyone has their preferred way of drifting off to dreamland, but these sleep patterns can cause snoring too. The Mayo Clinic states that sleeping on your back narrows the airways, causing snoring. An easy fix is to change your sleep style. Sleeping on your side or on your stomach may reduce the likelihood of snoring.

(Via: https://valleycentral.com/sponsored/spotlight/4-factors-that-contribute-to-snoring-and-simple-steps-for-a-good-nights-sleep)

Another cause of your snoring is that you could be suffering from a sleep disorder called sleep apnea. Unfortunately, snoring is a sign of sleep apnea. This is something that you should look into especially if your snoring is really loud and you wake up grasping for air.

Sleep apnea is a sleep disorder that causes you to stop breathing or gasp for air in the middle if the night. Loud snoring, feeling tired after a full night’s sleep, and gasping for air are some of the main symptoms. Doctors can conduct sleep tests to determine how severe the apnea is. If left untreated, sleep apnea can take a toll on the heart, lungs, and leave patients feeling tired with no desire to exercise. Treatment usually consists of sleeping with a continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) machine or an oral appliance to keep your airway passages open.

(Via: https://valleycentral.com/sponsored/spotlight/4-factors-that-contribute-to-snoring-and-simple-steps-for-a-good-nights-sleep)

These are the four surprising reasons why you snore and if you notice, sheer exhaustion is not one them. Keep in mind that …

Snoring Remedies That Actually Work

Originally at: https://snoringmouthpiecereview.org/snorerx/snoring-remedies-that-actually-work

We all want a good night’s sleep. That’s why we all look forward to sleeping when we get home from work. It’s the ultimate break from all the chaos and stress of the day. We all need to get a good night’s sleep to be able to rejuvenate. Unfortunately, there’s a major road block to getting a good night’s sleep and that is snoring.

According to The National Sleep Foundation, frequent snoring affects more than 100 million people in the U.S. Even more people experience infrequent snoring and may suffer from poor quality sleep. It will affect both the snorers and their partners, and may cause disrupted sleep for your entire family. It explains the high interest in quick fixes by snorers.

(Via: https://theinscribermag.com/snoring-remedies-for-a-better-night/)

We snore because the airflow in our nose and mouth is restricted. It is blocked by the tissues surrounding both our nose and mouth.

Snoring is caused by restricted airflow in the mouth and nose. When it is blocked by your esophageal and nasal tissues, air will cause an increased likelihood of vibration, which will be translated into sound.

(Via: https://theinscribermag.com/snoring-remedies-for-a-better-night/)

There are several causes of snoring. Allergies, sleeping pills, and heavy intake of alcohol could all cause someone to snore. Sleep apnea can definitely cause someone to snore all the time.

Common causes of snoring include underlying medical conditions such as sleep apnea, and allergies, or the use of sleeping pills or alcohol before bed.

(Via: https://theinscribermag.com/snoring-remedies-for-a-better-night/)

Not all snores are the same. Interestingly, there are different kinds of snorers.

Depending on the tissue involved, there are several types of snorers. Nasal snorers will experience snoring because of blocked passages or a deviated septum. Tongue-based snorers will often snore when the tongue is in a hyper-relaxed state. Mouth snorers sleep through their mouth while sleeping, which may cause the soft palate tissues to vibrate against each other.

(Via: https://theinscribermag.com/snoring-remedies-for-a-better-night/)

Whether the snore is coming from the nose, tongue, or the mouth, one thing is the same. The snore is irritating and it can hinder a peaceful sleep. Luckily, there are snoring remedies. As a matter of fact, there are a lot.

Considering the long list of snoring remedies, it’s unfortunate that only a few of them really work. Not all the snoring remedies are effective. It really depends of the gravity of the snore. Here are some of the chosen snoring remedies that actually work.

Sleeping on the side is actually one snoring remedy that works.

People who sleep on their back are more likely to snore because the position will cause the tongue to restrict airflow

12 Medications That Can Make You Fat or Ruin Your Sleep [Part 1, Podcast 64]

Originally at: https://doctorstevenpark.com/12-medications-that-can-make-you-fat-or-ruin-your-sleep-part-1-podcast-64

Prescription medications are the mainstay of modern medicine. But what we don’t realize is that many common medications have the potential to make you fat or ruin your sleep. Please join Kathy and me as we discuss 12 Medications that can Make You Fat or Ruin Your Sleep. This is Part 1, and in our next podcast, we will go over various ways to avoid prescription medications. 

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Shownotes:

3 reasons why we shifted from acute to chronic care for medications

3 pathways that medications aggravate sleep problems and weight gain 

  1. High blood pressure medications (lower melatoninand nasal congestion)
  2. Acid reducers (proton pump inhibitors)
  3. High cholesterol medications
  4. Antibiotics 
  5. Antihistamines
  6. Birth control pills

Estrogen dominanceDr. John Lee

Wisdom of Menopauseby Dr. Northrup

Estrogen promoting environmental toxins podcast

Endocrine disruption podcast (Trasande)

  1. Viagra and other medications for erectile dysfunction (nasal congestion)
  2. Oral steroids
  3. Antidepressants  

Reader comment about Paxil 

  1. Mood stabilizers

Upper airway resistance syndrome (UARS)

  11. Stimulants for ADHD

  12. Sleeping pills

Interview with Dr. Karkow on treatment resistant insomnia

Blog response on 7 Drugs That Can Cause OSA

https://doctorstevenpark.com/medications1

The post 12 Medications That Can Make You Fat or Ruin Your Sleep [Part 1, Podcast 64] appeared first on Doctor Steven Y. Park, MD | New York, NY | Integrative Solutions for Obstructive Sleep Apnea, Upper Airway Resistance Syndrome, and Snoring.

from Doctor Steven Y. Park, MD | New York, NY | Integrative Solutions for Obstructive Sleep Apnea, Upper Airway Resistance Syndrome, and SnoringBlog – Doctor Steven Y. Park, MD | New York, NY | Integrative Solutions for Obstructive Sleep Apnea, Upper Airway Resistance Syndrome, and Snoring https://doctorstevenpark.com/12-medications-that-can-make-you-fat-or-ruin-your-sleep-part-1-podcast-64…

A Tale To Tell: A Funny Story On Snoring

Originally at: https://snoringmouthpiecereview.org/good-morning-snore-solution/a-tale-to-tell-a-funny-story-on-snoring

Here’s a funny story. It’s about a husband who learned to stop his snoring on his own. Well, actually he got some help from his wife. But of course, he won’t admit that.

He starts his story animatedly, describing how his wife recorded his snoring.

My wife complained that I snore.

Ever forgiving in other aspects of our co-habitation, she decided to record me in the act.

She played it back while I was sleeping. She played it back in all its orchestral glory, thinking this might cure me.

But she says I broke into a two-part harmony.

She tried giving me left hooks and I woke up with bruises up my arm.

She said, “I thought you were dead. You stopped breathing.”

I heard, “You stopped breeding.”

“I was doing it in my sleep!” I exclaimed.

(Via: https://www.theglobeandmail.com/life/first-person/article-how-i-learned-to-stop-snoring-reluctantly/)

Aside from his snoring issues, the husband obviously has some hearing issues as well. Poor wife has to put up with both. Then again, you got to hand it to the husband, he eventually admitted that he had a snoring problem.

It takes a certain amount of self-criticism to reach the conclusion that your wife might be right about: a) your snoring, and b) about the need to do something about your snoring. So, as the final submission of the snorer to the snoree, I agreed to go to a sleep clinic to be tested.

(Via: https://www.theglobeandmail.com/life/first-person/article-how-i-learned-to-stop-snoring-reluctantly/)

So, he went to a sleep clinic. He checked himself in right in the middle of winter. You’d think the sleep clinic would be a posh, comfortable place. Based on his description, it was a far cry from it.

The bedroom I was assigned to was like a room in the Bates Motel. The art on the wall was enough to give me nightmares – blackbirds with yellow eyes, although the caption read, “Moonlight over the Prairies.”

The technician went to work on me. He placed suction caps with wires on my head and face. The wires were inserted into a box at my bedside that would transmit my brainwaves and my movements to the technician’s screen.

I felt like Frankenstein’s monster.

There were cameras on the walls. Shades of The Twilight Zone.

He told me to go to sleep now. He would be in the next room and if I needed anything, I just had to call out.

(Via: https://www.theglobeandmail.com/life/first-person/article-how-i-learned-to-stop-snoring-reluctantly/)

So, he called out when he needed to pee and that pissed off the technician.

The technician came in rubbing his eyes. He unplugged me from the machine. I had to go to the washroom with

12 Medications That Can Wreak Your Sleep or Make You Fat

Originally at: https://doctorstevenpark.com/12-medications-that-can-wreak-your-sleep-or-make-you-fat

Modern prescription medications are touted as a major advance in promoting health and keeping us alive longer. I beg to differ. What I observe instead is that in many cases, commonly prescribed prescription medications can wreak your sleep or make you fat, or both. As I have stated many times on this blog and in my book, Sleep, Interrupted, poor sleep promotes weight gain, and weight gain promotes sleep related breathing problems. Nasal congestion from medications may also ruin your sleep.

For example, Jane is a 51 year old woman who came to see me for her recurrent sinus infections and headaches. She took 5 courses of antibiotics this past year. Her doctor ordered a sinus CT which revealed that her sinuses were clear with no evidence of infection, except for a deviated nasal septum. Upon further questioning, she admitted that about 2 years ago, she gained about 15 pounds. Around the same time period, she was placed on a medication for high blood pressure, and was given another medication for chronic migraine headaches. She also started taking sleeping pills occasionally for insomnia. As expected, she admitted that her sleep quality had worsened and now wakes up to urinate about 2 times every night.

Looking back on Jane’s medical history, I noted four risk factors for weight gain and sleep loss. Besides the fact that she is in her pre-menopausal years (lower progesterone with lower tongue muscle tone), she was exposed to three medications which likely contributed to her weight gain in the past few years. What most patients (and many doctors) don’t realize is that a high number of prescription medications have the potential to cause weight gain, ruin your sleep, or both. If you’re taking a prescription medication, take a look at your package insert or look online for potential side effects. It’s more than likely that insomnia or weight gain will be on the list.

Here are 12 of the most commonly prescribed medications that can ruin your sleep or make you fat:

High Blood Pressure Medications and Weight Gain

Beta-blockers (such as atenolol, metoprolol, nadolol, propranolol) lower the effects of the hormone epinephrine, which constricts blood vessels. Alpha-blockers (prazocin, doxazocin or terazocin) help to relax muscles in the small vessels by blocking norepinephrine. Both of these classes of medications are known to promote weight gain. Other classes of antihypertensives including ACE inhibitors do not have this effect. 

Another way that high blood pressure medications can ruin your sleep is by blocking the pathway for making your sleep hormone, melatonin. Light stimulates receptors in the eye that stimulate nerves in …

Sleep Talk: Episode 40 – What is Normal Sleep?

Originally at: https://sleephub.com.au/podcast-40/

Episode 40: What is Normal Sleep?

Is it really normal to sleep for 8 hours undisturbed each night, or is that just an unrealistic expectation? We talk to Darian Leader, author of Why Can’t we Sleep? about how people have slept throughout history and how many of our expectations about sleep are driven by social fads.

Dr Moira Junge (Health Psychologist) and Dr David Cunnington (Sleep Physician) host the monthly podcast, Sleep Talk, talking all things sleep.

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Audio Timeline / Chapters:

  • 00:00 – 02:48 Introduction
  • 02:48 – 26:21 Theme – What is Normal Sleep?
  • 26:21 – 27:17 Clinical Tip
  • 27:17 – 29:20 Pick of the Month
  • 29:20 – 30:25 What’s Coming Up?

Next episode: When we eat

Links mentioned in the podcast: 

Presenters:

Guest interviews:

Credit: Angus Muir

Darian Leader is a psychoanalyst working in London and a member of the Centre for Freudian Analysis and Research and of The College of Psychoanalysts-UK. He is the author of several books including: ‘Why do women write more letters than they post?’; ‘Freud’s Footnotes’; ‘Stealing the Mona Lisa: What Art Stops Us From Seeing’; ‘Why do people get ill?’ (with David Corfield) , ‘The New Black: Mourning, Melancholia and Depression’, ‘What is Madness?’ , ‘Strictly Bipolar’ and ‘Hands’, and his most recent book, ‘Why Can’t We Sleep? (2019). He writes frequently about contemporary art. 

Darian’s latest book is Why Can’t we Sleep?

Regular hosts:

Dr Moira JungeDr Moira Junge is a health psychologist working in the sleep field, who has considerable experience working with people with sleeping difficulties in a multidisciplinary practice using a team-based approach. Moira is actively involved with the Australasian Sleep Association (ASA) and a board member of the Sleep Health Foundation. She has presented numerous workshops for psychologists and is involved with Monash University with teaching and supervision commitments. She is one of the founders and clinic directors at Yarraville Health Group which was established in 1998. In addition to her expertise in sleep disorders, her other areas of interest and expertise include smoking cessation, psychological adjustment to chronic illness, and grief and loss issues.

 

Dr David CunningtonDr David Cunnington is a sleep physician and director of Melbourne Sleep Disorders Centre, and co-founder and contributor to SleepHub