An App To Track Snoring

Originally at: https://snoringmouthpiecereview.org/snorerx/an-app-to-track-snoring

This app is interesting. It’s called the Sleep Cycle and it’s exactly what it is, a sleep tracking app.

Sleep-tracking app Sleep Cycle is bringing a new feature to its Android app to help snoring users track the sleep effects of their rather loud ailment.

(Via: https://techcrunch.com/2018/09/24/sleep-cycle-adds-snore-detection-to-its-sleep-tracking-android-app/)

For obvious reasons, it’s hard to track your sleep yourself. You can’t really rely on your partner to do it. The most that you can get from your partner is a litany of complaints, most especially if you’ve been a snorer for the longest time. Most likely, your partner is already fed up with you. So, don’t expect to get a decent feedback from a partner who has been putting up with you snore for the longest time.

That’s why the Sleep Cycle app is perfect for you.

Sleep Cycle is a great little app that helps you learn about your quality of sleep and helps wake you up at a time where you’re more likely to wake up feeling refreshed than groggy. There are a lot of smart home sleep trackers that do something similar with a linked pillow sensor, but Sleep Cycle just opts to use your phone’s sensors to gather data, which proves similarly robust.

(Via: https://techcrunch.com/2018/09/24/sleep-cycle-adds-snore-detection-to-its-sleep-tracking-android-app/)

If you’re wondering how it works, read on.

Basically it seems the app pairs the sound measurements with the accelerometer data from the phone placed on your bed and determines how closely tied your snoring is to restless movement, rolling that to help determine its “sleep score” metric.

If you don’t actually know if you’re snoring, the app will clue you into that as well with the feature enabled. You’ll be able to see how many minutes you snored, and listen to it as well.

The new feature is available now for the app’s Android version.

(Via: https://techcrunch.com/2018/09/24/sleep-cycle-adds-snore-detection-to-its-sleep-tracking-android-app/)

You can now download Sleep Cycle on Android.

With the Sleep Cycle, you will have a good idea as to how much you snore. You’ll know how long your usual snore is and the best thing is that you can actually listen to it.

This is a very scientific way of dealing with your snore. You get facts, not complaints,  about your snoring. The data from the Sleep Cycle can also be a big help to a medical expert who intends to help you.

Another good thing about the Sleep Cycle app is that you don’t need any other accessory to make it work. Unlike the other apps where you’re required to have a pillow or a pin to make it work, the Sleep Cycle app works by itself. …

Snoring Kills

Originally at: https://snoringmouthpiecereview.org/sleeptight/snoring-kills

This is not an exaggeration. Nor is it a joke. Snoring really kills. It’s not just because it can lead to deadly health conditions. It’s because habitual snoring can be so annoying that it can drive someone insane. Insane enough to kill.

That’s exactly what happened to a woman in Melbourne, Florida. She got so fed up with her snoring partner that she took matters into her own hands. In her desperation to silence her snoring partner, she took a gun and shot him.

A woman shot her live-in boyfriend with a shotgun during an alcohol-fueled argument stemming from his loud snoring, the Brevard County Sheriff’s Office reported.

Lorie Morin, 47, was charged with attempted murder and aggravated battery with a deadly weapon. She remains jailed without bond at the Brevard County Jail Complex.

(Via: https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2019/03/13/florida-woman-charged-shooting-boyfriend-shotgun-over-loud-snoring/3157577002/)

The shooting happened in the late evening of March 6. The place of the murder scene was in a rural neighborhood, west of Sharpes Lake. Unfortunately, the police came in a bit too late.

Deputies arrived at the home and found Morin’s boyfriend lying in a pool of blood at the foot of the bed on the master bedroom floor. He had been shot in the right armpit area.

He was transported by medical helicopter to Holmes Regional Medical Center in Melbourne.

(Via: https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2019/03/13/florida-woman-charged-shooting-boyfriend-shotgun-over-loud-snoring/3157577002/)

According to Morin, it was an accident. While she and her boyfriend were drinking, she handed him a loaded gun.

Morin told deputies she and her boyfriend had been drinking rum and playing rummy, an arrest affidavit shows. She told deputies that she was handing her boyfriend her loaded 20-gauge shotgun so she could retrieve a heavy box when it accidentally discharged, striking him.

(Via: https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2019/03/13/florida-woman-charged-shooting-boyfriend-shotgun-over-loud-snoring/3157577002/)

While in the ICU, the boyfriend told the police a more detailed story. Interestingly, it was quite different from Morin’s.

Thursday morning, deputies met with the man in the hospital’s intensive care wing. In a sworn recorded statement, he said the shooting stemmed from a confrontation over his snoring, the affidavit states. Morin followed him into the bedroom, arguing about his snoring – and then she pointed the shotgun at his head, according to the affidavit.

(Via: https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2019/03/13/florida-woman-charged-shooting-boyfriend-shotgun-over-loud-snoring/3157577002/)

While the boyfriend attempted to leave, he ended up being shot.

Deputies reported that as he attempted to leave, “he heard a loud boom and woke up lying in a pool of blood with excruciating pain coming from his right armpit area.”

(Via: https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2019/03/13/florida-woman-charged-shooting-boyfriend-shotgun-over-loud-snoring/3157577002/)

This is such a sad story. How could anyone think of shooting a snoring partner? One can only imagine how bad the snoring …

Sleep Talk: Episode 39 – Menopause

Originally at: https://sleephub.com.au/podcast-39/

Episode 39: Menopause

Menopause is a time of significant changes in sleep, as well as a range of other symptoms. Why does this occur and how can symptoms be addressed? In this episode we talk with Dr Sonia Davison, Endocrinologist and expert in Women’s Health.

Dr Moira Junge (Health Psychologist) and Dr David Cunnington (Sleep Physician) host the monthly podcast, Sleep Talk, talking all things sleep.

Leave a review and subscribe via iTunes

Audio Timeline / Chapters:

  • 00:00 – 03:05 Introduction
  • 03:05 – 26:55 Theme – Menopause
  • 26:55 – 27:40 Clinical Tip
  • 27:40 – 30:08 Pick of the Month
  • 30:08 – 31:23 What’s Coming Up?

Next episode: What to eat for sleep

Links mentioned in the podcast: 

Presenters:

Guest interviews:

Sonia Davison

Dr Sonia Davison is an Endocrinologist with a special interest in Women’s Health. She is a Clinical Fellow at Jean Hailes for Women’s Health and has an adjunct appointment at the Women’s Health Research Program, Monash University. Sonia is President-Elect of the Australasian Menopause Society (AMS) and was editor of AMS’s Change magazine for 9 years. Sonia is in private practice in Melbourne at Cabrini Medical Centre and at Jean Hailes for Women’s Health. Her PhD and postdoctoral research examined sex steroid physiology in women, including measurement of androgens and their relationships with age, mood, sexual function and cognition.

 

Regular hosts:

Dr Moira JungeDr Moira Junge is a health psychologist working in the sleep field, who has considerable experience working with people with sleeping difficulties in a multidisciplinary practice using a team-based approach. Moira is actively involved with the Australasian Sleep Association (ASA) and a board member of the Sleep Health Foundation. She has presented numerous workshops for psychologists and is involved with Monash University with teaching and supervision commitments. She is one of the founders and clinic directors at Yarraville Health Group which was established in 1998. In addition to her expertise in sleep disorders, her other areas of interest and expertise include smoking cessation, psychological adjustment to chronic illness, and grief and loss issues.

 

Dr David CunningtonDr David Cunnington is a sleep physician and director of Melbourne Sleep Disorders Centre, and co-founder and contributor to SleepHub. David trained in sleep medicine both in Australia and in the United States, at Harvard Medical School, and is certified as both an International Sleep Medicine Specialist and International Behavioural Sleep Medicine Specialist. David’s clinical …

Snoring And Sleep Apnea In Young Athletes Linked To Heart Problems

Originally at: https://snoringmouthpiecereview.org/snorerx/snoring-and-sleep-apnea-in-young-athletes-linked-to-heart-problems

Youth is almost completely synonymous with good health. Who would actually think that the young ones are at risk of any kind of  heart problems? Unfortunately, they, too, could face such problems. Such is the case with young athletes.

Young athletes, who snore and suffer from sleep apnea, are at risk of heart problems. This is backed up by a study.

A study of university rugby players has shown that they are more likely to suffer sleep disordered breathing than an average middle-aged man. The study also showed that the athletes who experience this problem are also more likely to have low levels of oxygen in their blood and higher pulse rates during the night, suggesting that athletes with sleep disordered breathing may be at risk of heart abnormalities.

(Via: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/03/190311081942.htm)

These findings aren’t exactly what you would expect from young and vibrant athletes. As a matter of fact, low levels of oxygen in the blood and high pulse rates are the last thing you’d expect from a young athlete at rest. Apparently, those dangerous symptoms are seen  in the alarming rate of young athletes dying from sudden cardiac diseases.

The researchers say this study could indicate that sleep disordered breathing is a factor in the phenomenon of seemingly healthy young athletes dying from a sudden and unexplained heart attack.

(Via: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/03/190311081942.htm)

So, what is a sleep disordered breathing? It must be something serious considering it affects young athletes. If it could affect them, it could possibly affect any young person as well.

Sleep disordered breathing (SDB) is characterised by abnormal respiratory patterns or pauses in breathing during sleep, ranging from snoring to sleep apnoea, where the airways close completely or partially many times during sleep. Having a high BMI, being over 40 years of age and having a large neck circumference are some of the common factors associated with SDB. If untreated, patients with SDB-related conditions face an increased risk of developing chronic diseases such as cardiovascular disease, heart failure and type 2 diabetes.

(Via: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/03/190311081942.htm)

It’s important to note that the study was conducted on young athletes involved in collision sports. Obviously, they’re a lot younger than 40. However, they’re considered to have a larger neck circumference and higher BMI.

The study, published in ERJ Open Research, was led by Yoshitaka Iso, a cardiologist and Associate Professor at Showa University Research Institute for Sport and Exercise Sciences, Yokohama, Japan. He explained: “We wanted to investigate the prevalence of sleep disordered breathing in collision sport athletes, such as rugby or American-style football players, because we know that they usually have a higher BMI

Stop The Snore: Here’s Another Treatment Option

Originally at: https://snoringmouthpiecereview.org/snorerx/stop-the-snore-heres-another-treatment-option

Do you sleep with a snorer? Or maybe you’re the snorer? Either one, snoring is a problem. It affects a lot of people. Folks, who are either snoring or affected by snoring,  are, most likely, sleep deprived. Sleep deprivation leads to a lot of serious illnesses.

At least 25 million adults across the United States suffer from obstructive sleep apnea, a chronic condition that can leave you feeling tired during the day and lead to serious health complications, according to the American Academy of Sleep Medicine.

(Via: http://www.centraljersey.com/time_off/health-matters-snore-no-more-new-treatment-option-for-sleep/article_76f342de-2d1a-5a06-bc05-8555400972f6.html)

The worst part of the growing problem of snoring is that there are a lot of folks who don’t get themselves checked for it.

Moreover, there are many other people with sleep apnea who have not been diagnosed or received treatment.

(Via: http://www.centraljersey.com/time_off/health-matters-snore-no-more-new-treatment-option-for-sleep/article_76f342de-2d1a-5a06-bc05-8555400972f6.html)

Not a lot of people take snoring seriously. That’s the probably the reason why they don’t go for treatment. For couples, who face a snoring issue, the most common solution is to sleep in another room. That doesn’t exactly solve the issue because the snorer is the problem.

One, who snores heavily and habitually, could already be suffering from sleep apnea. With little knowledge about sleep apnea, the snoring is ignored and most of the time, tolerated. When snoring is ignored and tolerated, it could lead to a lot of health problems in the future.

Obstructive sleep apnea occurs when the muscles relax during sleep, causing the soft tissue in the back of the throat to collapse and block the upper airway.

When this happens, it limits the amount of air that reaches your lungs and deprives your brain and body of oxygen. In response, your brain alerts your body, causing you to wake up briefly so that you can breath normal again.

These interruptions in sleep, which can occur multiple times throughout the night, can cause you to feel sleepy during the day and can increase the risk for high blood pressure, heart disease, type 2 diabetes, stroke, cancer and depression.

(Via: http://www.centraljersey.com/time_off/health-matters-snore-no-more-new-treatment-option-for-sleep/article_76f342de-2d1a-5a06-bc05-8555400972f6.html)

This not to scare everybody who snores. As a matter of fact, it doesn’t really mean that people who snore are already suffering from sleep apnea.

The most common sign of obstructive sleep apnea is loud and frequent snoring. However, not everyone who snores has sleep apnea. Snoring is likely to be a sign of sleep apnea when it is followed by periods of silence when airflow is reduced or blocked.

Additionally, people with sleep apnea will often make choking, snorting or gasping sounds when their airway reopens. Other symptoms of sleep apnea include:
• Daytime sleepiness or

Sleep Talk: Episode 38 – Sleep in Pregnancy

Originally at: https://sleephub.com.au/podcast-38/

Episode 38: Sleep in Pregnancy

Sleep problems are common in pregnancy and change as pregnancy evolves. What happens to sleep during pregnancy? What is the best way to deal with sleep through pregnancy? In this episode we tackle these questions with the help of Dr Liora Kempler of Integrated Sleep Health.

Dr Moira Junge (Health Psychologist) and Dr David Cunnington (Sleep Physician) host the monthly podcast, Sleep Talk, talking all things sleep.

Leave a review and subscribe via iTunes

Audio Timeline / Chapters:

  • 00:00 – 02:17 Introduction
  • 02:17 – 26:54 Theme – Sleep in Pregnancy
  • 26:54 – 28:48 Clinical Tip
  • 28:48 – 31:52 Pick of the Month
  • 31:52 – 32:50 What’s Coming Up?

Next episode: Menopause

Links mentioned in the podcast: 

Presenters:

Guest interviews:

Dr Liora Kempler graduated from a Bachelor of Advanced Science with a major in Psychology at the University of New South Wales. She is a Psychologist at the Woolcock Institute of Medical Research, Glebe and at the Integrated Sleep Health Clinic. Liora specialises in treating adults with sleep disorders, insomnia, depression, postnatal depression and anxiety as well as specialising in sleep during pregnancy and with infants and toddlers. Her preferred treatment practices include cognitive behavioural therapy, mindfulness, acceptance and commitment therapy and psychotherapy. Liora’s PhD project investigated the efficacy of a novel sleep intervention in helping first time expectant mothers better manage the changes and challenges in their sleep, both during pregnancy and as new mothers.

Regular hosts:

Dr Moira JungeDr Moira Junge is a health psychologist working in the sleep field, who has considerable experience working with people with sleeping difficulties in a multidisciplinary practice using a team-based approach. Moira is actively involved with the Australasian Sleep Association (ASA) and a board member of the Sleep Health Foundation. She has presented numerous workshops for psychologists and is involved with Monash University with teaching and supervision commitments. She is one of the founders and clinic directors at Yarraville Health Group which was established in 1998. In addition to her expertise in sleep disorders, her other areas of interest and expertise include smoking cessation, psychological adjustment to chronic illness, and grief and loss issues.

 

Dr David CunningtonDr David Cunnington is a sleep physician and director of Melbourne Sleep Disorders Centre, and co-founder and contributor to SleepHub. David trained in sleep …

Join Us in Austin for the Central Texas Narcolepsy Forum

Originally at: http://julieflygare.com/join-us-in-austin-for-the-central-texas-narcolepsy-forum/

Friends, I’m thrilled to share the news that Project Sleep is co-hosting a unique one-day event in Austin, TX with the Austin Narcolepsy Support Group on Saturday, June 15, 2019 from 10:00 a.m. – 3:00 p.m. Please join us for the Central Texas Narcolepsy Forum – see the full details and register today! 

Why am I so excited about this event?

  1. Todd J. Swick, MD is one of my very favorite people and narcolepsy experts! I’m so honored that Dr. Swick will join us for this event and share about novel upcoming treatments for narcolepsy type 1, type 2 and idiopathic hypersomnia. This is a VERY exciting time for narcolepsy drug development with many new options on the horizon, so Dr. Swick’s presentation is timely and important.
  2. In the afternoon, I’ll be leading a brand-new interactive workshop designed to help you effectively share your story in various settings from the dinner table to Capitol Hill. Sharing about our experiences with narcolepsy can be challenging, but our stories matter and are hugely effective tools for raising awareness and advocacy efforts.
  3. I’ve never been to Austin but heard great things! Plus, I’ve been in touch with the narcolepsy community there for many years now. A HUGE special shout out and thank you to Kami Barron and the Austin Narcolepsy Support Group for making this a reality! I’m so grateful for your kind invitation to speak in Austin.

Who Should Attend?

This event is appropriate for anyone looking to learn more about narcolepsy, both those very familiar with the condition along with healthcare providers, human resources and education professionals. 

Spread the word!

Print and share the event flyer or share this post with friends and family on social media.

See the full details and register today! Space is limited.

from Blog – Julie Flygare http://julieflygare.com/join-us-in-austin-for-the-central-texas-narcolepsy-forum/…

Solve The Snoring Problem To Save A Loving Relationship

Originally at: https://snoringmouthpiecereview.org/good-morning-snore-solution/solve-the-snoring-problem-to-save-a-loving-relationship

Why let snoring destroy a loving relationship? It’s totally absurd to let go of the one you love simply because of snoring.

Keep in mind that true love comes only once in a lifetime. Heck, it might not even come at all for some people. So, if it does come to you in the in the form of someone who snores, accept it wholeheartedly. Don’t let snoring break up your loving relationship. Sad to say, that’s a lot easier said than done. Truth be told, snoring can really put a strain in a relationship.

Being in the relationship itself is quite a challenge, but being in a relationship with a snorer is even harder. The same problem every night puts a great strain on the relationship. It disturbs both partners’ sleep. As a result, they feel exhausted during the day.

Snoring also leads to frustration between the couple since partner who can’t sleep well tends to blame a snorer. According to research conducted by Ohio State University, partners who don’t get at least seven hours of sleep tend to fight more. No wonder, restless nights lead to negative mood. It makes partners irritated and hostile towards each other.

(Via: https://www.praguepost.com/lifestyle/how-snoring-destroy-relationship)

Snoring not only affects the non-snorer partner. The thing about snoring is that it actually affects both the snorer and the non-snorer.

Snoring is also associated with different health risks such as chronic headaches, fatigue, obesity, and heart attack. So, both partners should take this issue seriously and work on it together. Let’s see how simple rules of sticking to a healthy diet, using snoring devices and sleeping on the side can rescue the relationship and bring intimacy back.

(Via: https://www.praguepost.com/lifestyle/how-snoring-destroy-relationship)

So, for a loving couple, snoring is actually a problem for both. The non-snorer simply cannot resort to sleeping in another room to solve the problem. Unfortunately, that becomes an easy solution for some couples faced with a snoring problem.

The latest survey by the National Sleep Foundation shows that 25% of couples are forced to sleep separately to get proper rest during the night.

(Via: https://www.praguepost.com/lifestyle/how-snoring-destroy-relationship)

Sleeping separately does not solve the problem of snoring. As a matter of fact, it’s going to be worse for the couple. Sleeping separately is not good for a relationship.

Sharing the bed during the night is considered healthy. It lowers blood pressure and reduces stress and tension because sleeping next to each other drops one’s cortisol level (a steroid hormone). More than that, it also helps to build trust in the relationship on the subconscious level. So, escaping the bedroom is never a

The Top 7 Toxins to Avoid for Better Sleep and Health [Podcast 63, Part 2]

Originally at: https://doctorstevenpark.com/toxins2 Dangers of Fluoride

In this episode Kathy and I continue our conversation about the most common toxins that we’re exposed to on a regular basis. We will talk about the potential dangers of fluoride, flame retardants and chlorine.

Download mp3 | Subscribe

Show Notes:

Fluoride, Flame retardants, Chlorine

Previous podcast #62 on the following toxins: BPA, PTFE, phthalates, lead 

Dr. Weston Price: Nutrition and Physical Degeneration

Sleep Interrupted: A physician reveals the #1 reason why so many of us are sick and tired 

Why Some Women Have Throat Pain Before Periods

Fluoride and IQ study

Chlorine swimming pool and asthma study

Negative health effects of chlorine

Branch Basics Discount

The post The Top 7 Toxins to Avoid for Better Sleep and Health [Podcast 63, Part 2] appeared first on Doctor Steven Y. Park, MD | New York, NY | Integrative Solutions for Obstructive Sleep Apnea, Upper Airway Resistance Syndrome, and Snoring.

from Doctor Steven Y. Park, MD | New York, NY | Integrative Solutions for Obstructive Sleep Apnea, Upper Airway Resistance Syndrome, and SnoringBlog – Doctor Steven Y. Park, MD | New York, NY | Integrative Solutions for Obstructive Sleep Apnea, Upper Airway Resistance Syndrome, and Snoring https://doctorstevenpark.com/toxins2…

Snoring: Why You Shouldn’t Ignore It

Originally at: https://snoringmouthpiecereview.org/sleeptight/snoring-why-you-shouldnt-ignore-it

There’s nothing good about snoring. It’s irritating and annoying. Snoring is a major roadblock to decent sleep. No one can get decent sleep if someone snores. Truth be told, even the snorer is deprived of some decent sleep as well.

The roar is deafening. And while it sounds like a joke, it’s not. Because what you’re hearing is your loved one having genuine difficulty breathing. You’re impacted too, definitely sleep deprived, and maybe a bit resentful. Fortunately, there are treatments for snoring that don’t involve separate bedrooms.

(Via: https://health.ucsd.edu/news/features/Pages/2019-03-11-dont-ignore-the-snore-sleep-apnea.aspx)

The point is, snoring is not to be ignored especially if it’s becoming an issue between you and your partner. It’s about time to take snoring seriously because there’s nothing funny about it.

Deep heavy snoring that occurs every night is bad for the health of both the snorer and the partner. It leads to sleep deprivation. So, if both you and your partner are sleep deprived, the two of you could eventually face some serious health problems.

“Snoring is an issue when it is habitual — when the sleep disruption occurs every night,” said Atul Malhotra, MD, professor of medicine at UC San Diego School of Medicine and director of sleep medicine at UC San Diego Health. “Snoring can be caused by a range of issues. But the louder the snoring is, the more likely the diagnosis is sleep apnea, a condition that causes breathing to stop repeatedly throughout the night.”

(Via: https://health.ucsd.edu/news/features/Pages/2019-03-11-dont-ignore-the-snore-sleep-apnea.aspx)

One simple way to cure snoring is to eat a healthier diet. If you’re the snorer, be honest with yourself. Take a look at your weight and do something about it. If your partner is the snorer, recommend a healthy diet.

Malhotra said being overweight also factors into snoring.
“Many patients, with diet and exercise, can reduce weight and eliminate snoring. It’s not an easy solution, but one that can produce good results that stop snoring and improve long-term health.”

(Via: https://health.ucsd.edu/news/features/Pages/2019-03-11-dont-ignore-the-snore-sleep-apnea.aspx)

Habitual snoring is an indication of a deeper health problem, like  sleep apnea. The repercussions of ignoring sleep apnea can lead to more dangerous health issues.

“Long-term impacts from sleep apnea may include neurocognitive and cardiovascular disease,” said Malhotra. “Theoretically, snoring can cause a harmful vibration in the carotid arteries that can lead to cerebrovascular injuries. These microscopic injuries, over time, may, at least in theory, result in stroke or other brain disorders.”

(Via: https://health.ucsd.edu/news/features/Pages/2019-03-11-dont-ignore-the-snore-sleep-apnea.aspx)

Snoring affects a lot of couples. It gets in the way of their life together. The loud, blasting snore that keeps you and your partner awake can really break up a loving partnership.…